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Bees

Discussion in 'Other Animals' started by JoanneF, Jun 24, 2021.

  1. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Well, one in particular. Or one type maybe. But over the last couple of days we have been seeing a very disoriented bee in the garden. I've put him on to high pollen plants a couple of times, but he keeps ending up on our slabs.

    Any ideas on helping him?

    Screenshot_20210624-131353_Gallery.jpg Screenshot_20210624-131346_Gallery.jpg
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Ooh, bombus hypnorum, tree bumblebee, I think :) You could try giving it a drop of sugar water. Not in anything it could drown in, obviously - maybe a spoon.
     
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  3. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I would say the same as JudyN...they can become disorientated/confused when chemicals used on plants take over their nervous system .. however there is also a fly parasite called Apocephalus borealis which lays its eggs in a living bee, turning the insect into a live host meal for its offspring which means the bee will fly away from it nest and will be disorientated before it dies
    This is an interesting read How to help a bee in distress - Honey Bee Suite
     
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  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thank you. I hope it isn't the parasite, that sounds like a horrible death.
     
  5. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    When you start delving into the world of bugs and their parasites, you learn stuff tht can give you sleepless nights. And then when you do drop off, you dream of zombie cockchafers.... :eek:
     
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  6. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    ........ and now we know where these TV/film script writers get their ideas for their horror films!
     
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  7. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    Apocephalus borealis is not the only issue the Varroa mite a tiny parasite cling onto the bee and suck the blood like fluid from its body. If that isn’t horrifying enough, they also spread viruses through the colony....then there is the small hive beetles which lay massive amounts of eggs in the unprotected combs, when the worker bees are out. Their egg hatchlings grow up faster than aliens in a horror movie, only to lay more eggs in the combs and eventually the bees/hive is gone. The wax moth chew through the honeycombs, leaving behind a thick, silky web that can destroy a hive in as little as a week....not to mention Pesticide poisoning, Pollination , Mono cropping.... and a fun fact there are nearly 20,000 species of bees and that only a few of them make honey
     
  8. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Twenty-four of which I've spotted in my garden and managed to identify. Solitary bees in particular are a pig to id so I also have a load of photos of unidentified ones!
     
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  9. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I find Bees facinating little 'beings'
     
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  10. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    I love 'em. But it's tough being an insect, and there is so much that eats them.

    Sounds of summer that you don't hear much nowadays - a push-along lawnmower, the humming of bees, and a game of village cricket not far away "bok - howzat -"
     
  11. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I hear the humming of bees alright - a neighbour has a couple of hives, and we had a swarm in the garden yesterday. I was delighted when he first moved in, but I've realised now the extent to which they compete with other species and actually reduce numbers of 'wild' bees.
     
  12. RGC

    RGC Active Member Registered

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    Fox cubs playing in the garden at twilight and relocating plastic pots.
     

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  13. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    "A swarm in May is worth a load of hay. A swarm in June is worth a silver spoon. A swarm in July isn't worth a fly". You just made it!
     
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  14. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I had never heard of that
     
  15. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Oh wow... I thought the bees swarmed yesterday, but they were just warming up...



    IMG_0346 resized.JPG IMG_0344 resized.JPG

    Naturally, you'd have to be a complete idiot to go and stand right in the eye of the swarm, so to speak, and take photos... It seems I'm an idiot (Mr N has just told me I am so it must be true). But it was quite elemental, standing there with them seething around me. I felt a few brush against me, but didn't get stung.

    I did give Jasper his tea indoors, though. I'm not that much of an idiot!
     
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  16. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Sensible!

    If you phone the police, they keep a list of beekeepers, and one will come out and take your swarm away, assuming it's still there.
     
  17. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    As alarming swarm of bees might look, standing next to one...or even amongst it is quite 'safe'. As the bees prepare to swarm and leave the hive for a search a new place to live, they will take some of the food stores with them by filling their bellies with honey. Tummies full of honey is when they are as calm as they come....and not only that, it is then physically difficult for them to bend their bodies for stinging position. As honey bee die for the result of stinging us..they don't tend to do it without a good reason. So newly emerged swarm has the least will to get into a 'fight' with you.....wait another few days and that swarm might have totally different attitude if they are struggling to find suitable place themselves, desperation and hunger can make them behave quite differently...;)

    ETA...little story to add; some years ago....I was called to collect a swarm from the top of shopping centre roof. Because I was sure it wasn't a swarm from my hives that I was keeping nearby....I wore a suit for 'just in case' (but still wearing my sandals :rolleyes:). I had arranged to security men to keep people away from the service yard bellow...but they failed to keep themselves away :rolleyes:
    Bees were hanging in difficult place for me to scoop them into carboard box I had armed myself with...and with the weight of the large swarm, the box slipped from my fingers and dropped onto the yard several stories bellow me :eek:. You can imagine what happened when box of bees slam from that height onto concrete floor....there was a storm cloud of bees flying in that closed up area.
    No bees that I could tell was killed.....no security men were stung...the bees just buzzed around for a while and settled again on one of the building walls. This time for much easily to reach place and I was able to work safely from the ground level :D
    The whole thing was witnessed by people in nearby office building and somebody took photo of me just before the accident happened...I only found out about it when it was posted on local paper :D

    hive 2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2021
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  18. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Or by going on BBKA website (British beekeepers association) where one can find out how to get in touch with somebody who does collect swarms...
    Not many places have 'local police' anymore as the areas are merged together...so details do get lost or are being ignored.
    Although swarms are considered as 'anybody's property' once they have left their premises...it is good thing to notify nearby beekeeper(s) that one may know having bees nearby, they will quite likely know if their bees have swarmed and are quite likely keen to have them back.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2021
  19. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    @Finsky, that's quite a story! Thanks for sharing.
     
  20. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thanks for the updated info, Finsky :)
     

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