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Boxer Gait - hips knackered?

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Diesel's Dad, Jun 3, 2019.

  1. Diesel's Dad

    Diesel's Dad Active Member Registered

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    Hi all,

    Totally out of the blue whilst walking Diesel just now a fellow dog walker said “lovely dog, shame his hips are knackered”. Apparently he’s walking funny! I asked what made him say that and his comment was that he's had many big dogs over the years and apparently my pup walks like his 12 year old GSD!

    Nobody else ever commented on this.

    Please take a look at this clip and let me know what you reckon, particularly if you’ve got a boxer or related breed.



    Many thanks.

    DD
     
  2. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    Cant say Im an expert on boxer gait but just wanted to sympathise..
    Recently I posted a photo of Murphy enjoying a sunny morning and some know it all said " great dog pity that his legs turn out and hes barrel chested"
    Blooming cheek !

    If you're worried have a chat to your vet , but take these sort of comments with a pinch of salt..
     
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  3. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

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    My first thoughts were how rude of someone to pass judgement on your boy! Not really knowing the correct gait of a young boxer I wouldn’t know if he was moving any differently to an adult dog, and surely a GS would be quite different ! I’m sure your vet would have picked up on any problems when he went for his check ups as a pup, if you are concerned ask your vet to give him a check up but he’s probably fine :rolleyes:
     
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  4. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    Agree.
    I routinely get comments on how angry and upset my 6 m.o. baby Ridgeback is by dog experts pointing at his ridge, and saying his hair is up.
    I’d ask the vet to observe him moving and see if there’s anything out of the ordinary.
     
  5. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Active Member Registered

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    Rather stunned that someone would think it is acceptable to make a comment like that!
    Not sure whether ‘owning lots of big dogs and having an old GSD’ really qualifies him to pass judgement on the state of your dog’s hips:mad:. However, just hearing this sort of comment is bound to unsettle you, so I agree with the above posts: I would see your vet if it helps to put your mind at rest.
    Unbelievable:eek: Did they even know what breed he is?
    This made me laugh!
     
  6. Diesel's Dad

    Diesel's Dad Active Member Registered

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    thanks all. yes of course will ask the vets for an opinion. The vets we use were amazing with our dearly departed kitties but yet to be convinced they have half a clue about larger breed dogs. we always seem to end up seeing recently graduated vet who has little real experience. Due to pop down there tomorrow for a weigh in so will show the video to one of the more experienced nurses who has always been great for us.

    we've also just started a training course with a chap who has just retired from training police dogs, pretty sure his advice will be of equal value if not better that the vet!

    DD
     
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  7. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    @Buddy1 no the person thought Murphy was a spaniel cross..
    Just an armchair expert spreading nonsense much like the one who insulted Diesels dad...
     
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  8. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    It’s hard to say much based on that particular clip - as the POV is directly behind the dog, who’s walking away, plus the camera is angled slightly down, not at the level of the dog’s rump [from that distance, or even further away], or better yet, his hocks.

    My personal hunch, however, has zip to do with his hips - i suspect there is some instability in his knees. // I am not a vet; i can neither diagnose nor prescribe, i don’t have x-ray vision, & i haven’t seen Ur dog in person, let alone done a hands-on exam of his anatomy. OTOH, i am a trainer with over 35 years experience handling dogs, i’m a certified veterinary assistant, & as a pre-veterinary student, my undergraduate majors were Ag Education & Animal Science. Anatomy & physiology were important subjects, & gait can be a powerful telltale of underlying issues.

    If it’s not too much trouble, I would love to see a SIDE-ON video of him walking, with the camera level with his shoulders at the very minimum, or even at the level of his knees / hocks as he moves.

    If he consistently paces when he ‘walks’, moving both limbs on each side together forward & back as he strides, as opposed to the 4-beat walk where each foot falls individually or a 2-beat trot [when diagonal limbs move together, for instance, L fore & Rt rear / Rt fore & L rear], he is shifting bodyweight from his rear onto his shoulders, to relieve pain - that might be short-term discomfort due to a minor strain or sprain, which will probably recover over a brief period with some rest & avoiding any strains, or it could be chronic pain, whether minor or major, from a luxating patella, worn cartilage, bad structure, or some other cause.
    Arthritic changes in joints can result even in young animals, when joint structure or connective tissue /cartilage issues cause inflammation & wear to joint surfaces. :(

    Also, i saw this thread late, & odds are good that U have already consulted yer vet -
    Just a suggestion, U might want to consider taking out vet insurance if U don’t already have a policy, BEFORE there is any definitive diagnosis.
    Insurance will not cover any “pre-existing condition”, & as a lay person, i can state my opinion about a dog without prejudicing her or his eligibility for medical coverage; my opinion literally doesn’t count. But a diagnosis by a vet of any problem before he’s fully covered, will permanently block any potential reimbursement for treating that problem [assuming it can be treated, vs monitored, controlled via diet, etc].


    All digits crossed,
    - terry

    Terry Pride, CVA; member Truly Dog-Friendly
    “dogs R dogs, wolves R wolves, & primates R us.” - © 2004


    .
     
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  9. Alanward87

    Alanward87 Member Registered

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    I own a boxer who is about 5 months old now and I am far from an expert so my opinion really means nothing.

    If I had to make an observation and comparison, when compared to how my boy walks, my boy seems a little more free in his back end being less rigid but generally he is rather excited to be out and his tail (well his stump as my boy is a Bob tail) is constantly frantically wagging and jumps like a spring lamb when off the lead lol. I wouldn't look to much into others comments from rude people in the street. You know your boy best and will likely notice a change or signs of discomfort. If you have any doubts, the best bet is see your vet. I would be intrested to hear what the outcome is.

    Fingers crossed all is well.
     
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