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Dogs and Covid-19

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by archiemum, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. archiemum

    archiemum New Member Registered

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    My 5 year old lurcher is on a 4 week post-operative strict short lead walks/no playing regime- hard going for a dog that walks (runs!) at least 3.5 miles a day, often more. We’re now into week 3 and, as if that weren’t bad enough, as I’m having to self isolate during the Covid crisis, we’re not allowed visitors...it’s just him and me! I’m wondering if anyone can advise me about how I can socialise him (after his post-op period) Will it be ok for my daughter to pick him up and take him to theirs for a play with their pup or to take him for a walk en famille?
     
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  3. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    This is what the RSPCA have to say:
    However, the PDSA have slightly different advice:

    So it'll be fine for other family members to walk him as long as you follow sensibe precautions :)
     
  4. JRT_ftw

    JRT_ftw Active Member Registered

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    I'm a little concerned because my mother always stops and chats to people whenever she walks the dog and she's not standing back two meters. Does this mean Rocco and my mother are at high risk of getting Coronavirus?
     
  5. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Rocco will be fine - all the evidence suggests that dogs can't get it. Your mum is taking risks. The thing is, she's not just risking her own health, but the health of everyone else she comes into contact with. If she gets it she'll be infectious before she knows she's not well, so every single person she talks to at close range is at risk, along with everyone else they talk to, and they talk to, plus all of their families. Some will be older/vulnerable and much more likely to die, and any of them who need NHS treatment will be preventing someone else from getting that treatment. If there's only one ventilator left and a usually reasonably healthy 60-year-old needs it, and so does an 85-year-old, we will get to the point where the 85-year-old just won't get the treatment they need as those most likely to survive will be prioritised.

    It's like the argument that neutering one cat can prevent many thousands of unwanted kittens from being born, but now we're talking about humans and death....
     
    JRT_ftw and excuseme like this.
  6. Biker John

    Biker John Well-Known Member Registered

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    One further point that bothers me. I live on my own, now if I get COVID19 but I am able to stay at home Folly would be fine. But if I get bad enough to be taken into hospital what could be done with her? Presumably their are quite a few others in the same position.
     
  7. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    @Biker John, is there anyone else who would volunteer to look after her? Family or friends?
     
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Does the Cinnamon Trust do fostering or is it just walking?
     
  9. Biker John

    Biker John Well-Known Member Registered

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    JudyN, possibly if I am in a position to think clearly at the time, but I am wondering what happens if say an ambulance picked someone up and their was a dog in the house. What would or indeed could be done.
     
  10. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    There are key fobs that you can get which say ”pet at home”, you could also put a note in your wallet - if you were taken to hospital and unable to communicate, you would hope they would look there for ID and for contact information.
     
    Ragsysmum and Biker John like this.

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