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Fle

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by roline83, May 31, 2022.

  1. roline83

    roline83 New Member Registered

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    Hi all

    We just got our minature Jack Russell at the weekend, he needs some flea treatment but most that I have seen are for 2kg and over and any others for under 2kg state that the dog needs to be 8 weeks and over. He isn't eight weeks until Thursday and is only 1600g. Any ideas what, if any, flea treatment I can give him?

    Thanks
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    If he's not 8 weeks old, he shouldn't (by law) have been taken from his mother - and he certainly shouldn't have come to you with fleas. But I don't know the circumstances, so there may be a good reason why you took him at such a young age.

    Someone else might know about appropriate flea treatments, but I would ask your vet what they would recommend - if he hasn't had a thorough health check, I would take him to the vet for one anyway.
     
  3. roline83

    roline83 New Member Registered

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    Hi

    Due to personal circumstances we got him four days early. He didn't come to us with fleas, I'm just aware that he needs flea treatment for prevention.

    We are booked into the vets at the weekend for vaccines but was just checking where I stand prior to that.
     
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  4. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Why put chemicals on your puppy if there is nothing visible to treat.o_O

    "Frontline" is very effective and safe for young puppies and kittens from 2 days of age onwards.
    There are reports of the product not being effective these days, I have not come across this problem. Be sure to read the instructions thoroughly and use exactly as instructions recommend.
    I use the spray and rub this into the dogs coats thoroughly making the dogs look quiet wet.
    I do sometimes use spot on's but not as regular treatment, only to cure what is seen at the time.
    We do not suffer from flea infestations very often, it may depend on where we have been for a walk.
     
  5. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    A flea comb is harmless and efficient except for really serious outbreaks. I have also used a flea-zapper comb that uses a battery to nuke fleas by a tiny electric shock.

    But for such a very young puppy, I'd keep everything to a minimum unless you actually see fleas.
     
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  6. RGC

    RGC Well-Known Member Registered

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    As Hemlock has stated, I’d suggest a fine tooth flea comb rather than using chemicals at such a young age. A bowl of water with Dettol (other disinfectants are available) to dispose of the little blighters would help. Used this procedure with our cats several years ago. Should help bonding.
     
  7. RGC

    RGC Well-Known Member Registered

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    “……..to dispose of the little blighters…..” - I was referring to the fleas. Sorry for any misunderstanding.
     
  8. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    When I was a child, Ma would take in a rescue puppy each time we had a new dog, and my job was to have the puppy on my lap (on a thick layer of newspaper) and go through it with a flea comb, dipping the comb in a jam jar of paraffin to nuke the fleas! Health n' safety eat your heart out - definitely not recommended (but worked a treat).

    After that, we used Keatings powder which I think was DDT. Also not recommended. It's a wonder we survived it.
     
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  9. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    DDT, Gosh that's turning the clocks back a bit:eek:

    I remember my parents dipping fingers into parafin and rubbing onto the dogs skin to get rid of lice and that certainly worked too.

    Farm vet suggested Ivermectin sheep wormer to get rid of ear mite, it worked and all ok.
    Ringworm on the dogs, "Griseofulvin (by mouth) or Canesten cream, (both for humans) under vet supevision, worked well.

    What would we do without the good old times and knowledgeable old vets
     
  10. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Ivermectin (for anyone hoping to use it) can be extremely dangerous for a few breeds like Border collies and huskies, or those with such breeds as part of their mix. I'm sure you know this but some people may not.
     
  11. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes of course Hemlock, I was not thinking any further than our lot, very careless of me
     
  12. roline83

    roline83 New Member Registered

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    Thanks everyone. I did see a few fleas and ended up having to treat him. The vet checked him over at the weekend and didn't see any thankfully.
     
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