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Greeting other dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Walking' started by Jack-Russell-Lover, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    As mentioned in another thread, today on our walk we saw another Jack Russell whose owner didn't want to allow to greet so Rox barked at, and a possible collie cross whippet or something....again owner didn't want her greeting so Roxy barked. People annoy me, dogs need to greet others as much as possible as long as they're friendly, Roxy may bark but only if she doesn't get to greet, she just wants to say hello! Some people around here just try to put as much distance as possible between the dogs! Fair enough there are some who are not comfortable with other dogs, like a boxer we see sometimes but the owner has told me that so that's fine, no problems at least I know that dog has issues so I keep Rox away. It just makes me dread seeing other dogs on a walk, knowing that most don't like their dog greeting others and therefore Roxy will bark at them and the owner will probably assume she isn't friendly so will definitely avoid in the future too!
    Do dog walkers in your area let greet?..
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I have a different view on this - as humans we don't approach and greet every passing stranger and I think for a dog, being dog neutral is a more normal behaviour. We also don't know what the other dog's situation is - maybe nervous, ill, recovering from injury, elderly etc.
     
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  3. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    I dont let Murphy greet every dog we meet. I dont want him to learn that I will stop and let hom greet every dog and I might be busy training with him so I dont want the distraction. Plus if the dog is a yappy one I avoid it .. just in case.

    When we are in the park and he is having ' free time' then I will let him meet other dogs again avoiding yappy ones. He does not like dogs that bark so I could not guarantee he would remain calm
     
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think it's up to individual owners to decide whether they want other dogs to approach them, regardless of reason, and it's up to owners to only let their dog greet those the other owner is happy for them to greet. Jasper is dog neutral almost all of the time but does get fed up if another dog won't leave him alone, and can give them a right royal telling-off if they can't remove their nose from his bum.
     
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  5. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    It's great if you do have a park to let your dog greet other dogs and play but in my location it is pretty boring walk wise, just road walks available and don't always see other dogs. So I think it's important to allow dogs to greet if they pass each other. Is socialisation not important? Are dogs not social animals?

    Yeah I get some dogs may be nervous and I do see dogs that completely freeze up and avoid eye contact with Rox as we pass but the dogs we went past today, looked totally healthy to me and were eager to greet...if dogs are Ill or recovering from injury should they be out walking at all? Particularly in this heat.....
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2018
  6. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    To me, socialisation is a slightly different thing - it's about having your dog get only good and positive experiences during his formative puppy period - so, for example meeting calm role model dogs in a controlled setting; people in uniforms, with hats and with beards; walking on different surfaces and hearing different noises. That helps shape the adult dog he will become. A lot of people think quantity rather than quality but to avoid flooding (overwhelming) the dog it should be the other way round
     
  7. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    ..Okay so whatever the adult equivalent of socialisation is then....:rolleyes::confused:
     
  8. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Same thing, really. They should be able to interact with and not interact with another dog calmly, but they don't learn the former by the owner letting all and sundry come over to them to say hello. Seeing a dog and not going up to it to say hello is as important as, maybe more important as being able to greet another dog nicely.

    Contrary to what was thought, dogs aren't pack animals in the way that wolves are. Sure, they're social, but stray dogs live in much looser groups. An adult dog doesn't need to interact with other dogs at all to be happy and well balanced - Jasper would be quite happy not to meet a dog again, not because he doesn't like them but just because they're not important to him. It's the owners, with their treat pouches, who he loves. The aim of socialisation is to ensure that when interactions do happen, they go well - but 'go well' is just as much a quick sniff and walk on by as initiating play.
     
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  9. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    Very true, all attempts to stop Rox from barking when she doesn't get to greet have been given up, we just don't see enough other dogs to practice! :(
     
  10. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

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    Harri is overly friendly with other dogs so he'd be desperate to greet yours.

    I am however currently working with him to try and get him to be much more dog neutral and to wait for my permission before he approaches other dogs. This means that I don't allow him to greet every dog we meet even if the other dog wants to say hello.

    At the moment he has to be on lead where other dogs are around as no treat is more high value to him than the social interaction. As a significant number of dogs are reactive he is putting himself in danger by approaching them. Training him to keep him safe is my priority.
     
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  11. Teddy560

    Teddy560 Active Member Registered

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    This is what Teddy is like. He LOVES other dogs and playing and no food is worth being able to play with another dog. I can see both sides of the situation. I do think being able to socialise for some dogs is important to them. Just like it is for some people. Teddy would be miserable if he didn't get to play chase etc and be around otger dogs. But he does have to learn to be dog neutral too. Luckily we have friends round the corner with a pup the same age who he pkays with regualarly. If we are off lead walking I normally call him over and ask the owner as the approach if they'd like me to keep him on a lead.
     
  12. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

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    Harri would just ignore me and race straight over to the other dog. I have to rely on spotting an approaching dog first and recalling him before he sees it. Otherwise there is no chance.
     
  13. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    yes it is important and yes they are social but its also important to know when and where is appropriate. You say other people annoy you when they dont allow greetings and I dont want to be harsh but a huge bug bear of many people are the canine social butterflies who just have to say hello..
    Its the human equivilent of that guy in the bar who wont take no for an answer..You end up wanting to slap him.
    Social interaction is nice but it has to be mutual. You might want to concentrate on training Rox to walk on when she sees another dog and only when you and the other human say its ok can she and the other dog greet.. Barking to get her own way is a slippery slope.
     
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  14. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    I know I should train her out of it but like I said that's hard to do when you don't have other dogs to practice with...kinda essential. Obviously you can't just do it in one session, I'd need at least one other dog daily to train with which I don't have.
     
  15. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    We're one of the avoiders. Our dog is scared of other dogs and will bark and lunge if he's approached by other dogs, especially if they come bounding up to him, more so if they're out of sight until they're right next to him. So yes, we do our utmost to avoid other dogs to avoid a canine confrontation. I'm sure other dog walkers draw their own conclusions, but without knowing our dog's background, their conclusion is likely to be way off the mark,
     
  16. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Train using whoever you see on walks. There will be a distance at which Roxy will see another dog but not react, even if it's half a mile away. When she spots the dog, say her name and give her a treat, then walk away from the dog. Do this as many times as possible, and in time it would work when you're closer to the other dog.

    If you search for 'Look at that' dog training on the internet you should find some good resources.
     
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  17. Sezzy

    Sezzy Well-Known Member Registered

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    We’re the same as @arealhuman I'm afraid. Misty does not like most other dogs so we are avoiders. The only ones she is happy to meet are the old boys who just stand there not interested and let her sniff their bum :eek:. I do find most walkers who are out walking the roads seem to just want to get past and don’t want to stop anyway, it’s the ones in parks etc who seem to have more time and then both human and dog want to say hello.
     
  18. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    And @Sezzy That's so unfortunate :/ I understand in that situation it's better for the dog if you avoid others.

    Would that work though if I don't always see other dogs on walks? So it wouldn't be reinforced daily, more a couple of times a week....
     
  19. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    There's no harm in trying :) I know a lot of people who would love being able to meet so few dogs on walks!
     
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  20. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    I will try it the next time we see someone! Haha, yea most days we don't come across any, it shocked me that we saw three this morning!
     
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