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Growling puppy.

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Lucie Lou, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. Lucie Lou

    Lucie Lou New Member Registered

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    Last night my puppy (12 weeks) growled and snapped at my OH.
    To be fair Otto was was in a deep sleep in his bed and was picked up suddenly to go out for bedtime toilet.. I’m sure we would all do the same!
    It has worried me a little though as I’ve never had an aggressive dog in all the years I have owned them.
    I’m pretty certain that with some gentle waking up it wouldn’t have happened but how do I stop aggressive display early if it becomes a problem?
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    There's a reason for the saying 'Let sleeping dogs lie' ;) Let's face it, if someone lifted me from my bed when I was sound asleep, (a) I could freak out and react before I'd worked out what had happened and (b) even once I had worked out what was happening I'd be pretty peed off at someone doing that.

    Personally I wouldn't even wake her by stroking her. I would quietly call her name, and let her come round in her own time. Or call her happily if she then jumps up keen and ready to go into the garden.

    If she growls in any other circumstances, never tell her off for the growl (or even snap), as she might learn to suppress the growl and then go straight for the snap 'without warning'. A growl isn't aggression, it's a communication that she is uncomfortable with the situation. Then sit back, think about why she felt uncomfortable, and either work out a way of managing the situation so she's not made to feel uncomfortable (e.g. if she's anxious with people being close to her when she's eating then just leave her in peace), or a way of her feeling more comfortable with what you're doing (e.g. in the food bowl situation, take a step towards her, throw her a treat, and move back, so she sees your proximity as a good thing).
     
  3. Lucie Lou

    Lucie Lou New Member Registered

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    Thank you for your reply. I’m in full agreement.
     
  4. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    Cant put it any better than @JudyN I would never pick up or touch a sleeping dog without warning.
     
    millymojo1, JudyN and Lucie Lou like this.
  5. Lucie Lou

    Lucie Lou New Member Registered

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    I knew exactly where he had gone wrong and told him so at the time. I know he won’t do it again. I don’t know what he was thinking .. stupid thing to do.
     

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