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Head collars

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by Marie1958, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. Marie1958

    Marie1958 Member Registered

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    Interested in what you guys think about "head collars" the type that goes across the nose to help with pulling on lead. Someone told me to get one as that may help Rosie to learn not to pull me when she sees another dog or just want to go different direction
    She has good days and bad with this tried treats while shes walking nicely but if she sees something that catches her attention then few times shes nearly pulled me over, i know my stability isnt great at moment due to stroke, have looked into finding dog walker but not sure on that at moment
     
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  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    They are basically a tool, so they do serve a purpose. They work by being aversive; the dog pulls and it's uncomfortable, so she stops pulling. It's not something I would normally recommend but I think for your own safety you need to put your needs first. Watch out for them riding up towards the eyes when they tighten - there are different styles and I think that is one to avoid.

    You night find this article interesting.
    The Problem With Head Halters - Suzanne Clothier/Carpe Canem Inc.

    And if you want to work on the behaviour of pulling, this is a good little session from Kikopup

     
  3. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I used one with my large, occasionally dog-reactive lad when he was young and though I agree with Joanne that they're not ideal, as they are suppressing behaviour, but it did work for us.

    I don't think they're necessarily aversive in that they're uncomfortable, just that it's much more difficult for the dog to pull against them as the harder he pulls, the more his head will be turned towards the owner. Imagine trying to pull against something that was attached to your nose...

    After using one for a while, along with the usual training, rewarding good behaviour and so on, I think Jasper realised that lunging didn't work any more so it wasn't worth bothering, and not lunging meant nice things happening.

    The only time I can have problems controlling Jasper is if he should spot one of his favourite people. When I had knee problems recently, I did feel quite vulnerable and if it was going to be a long-term thing then I'd quite possibly put him back in a head collar for the safety of both of us.

    You might want to try a few to get one that fits well.
     
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  4. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    I agree go to a good pet shop and find one that fits well. Dont just go by the advice on the packaging.
    We used one for a little while with our BC because he had never been on a lead and would tug like a train I was ill at the time and I didnt have the strength to hold him on a normal lead so until he calmed down a bit it was a godsend. But once I was well and he had calmed we never needed it again.
     
  5. Ragsysmum

    Ragsysmum Member Registered

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    Never needed one with a greyhound but have used one with a whippet and a podenco which made walking more comfortable and safer too.
     
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  6. Marie1958

    Marie1958 Member Registered

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    Thankyou for all your replies, its really helped me decide into getting one the video is also good as taught me a few things.
    Small update. Rosie has been getting a bit of a runaround out in communal back garden off lead chasing ball she has started to come to me when i call (lots treats and cuddles)so very positive on that now, i dont even have to put leash on her at all wouldnt attempt it on the field yet but its a small step for both of us.
     
  7. Alexliu

    Alexliu New Member Registered

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    If you’re not familiar, a dog head halter is a sort of harness that you attach to your dog’s head. Unlike a collar, pulling your dog with a halter doesn’t hurt him or her. If you’re a dog owner who doesn’t like it when you have to pull your dog by the neck, then maybe a nice head halter will be a better alternative.

    Training a pet dog with a head collar has numerous advantages over training using a traditional or coaching collar. For starters, head collars are often easier to use for start canine trainers than are training collars. Head collars can also be quite effective at preventing pet dogs from yanking or controlling and retraining puppies that often pull.

    A dog head halter loops over your dog’s muzzle just below the eyes. You then attach your leash below your dog’s chin. When your dog pulls, the dog head halter puts pressure on the top of his muzzle, pulling his chin down or to the side. This reduces the strength that a dog has to pull. It also gives you some control over your dog’s gaze, making it easier to redirect a reactive dog on walks.

    Head collars may be excellent for managing pet dogs which are very strong, or for using a pet within a region that contains a great many interruptions. For example, head collars are perfect for as soon as your dog is with an trip, or in a location where you will see other pet dogs and other distractions.

    Although a head collar can be a fantastic tool, it must not be used as a substitute for efficient proper dog training. A head collar is most effective when it is used in conjunction with strong and practical training your dog strategies, including compensate instruction along with other types of good strengthening.

    Disadvantages of head collars

    Despite the fact that head collars have many positive aspects, they have some distinctive drawbacks also. For starters, head collars tend to make many puppies influenced by the gear, and they also quickly understand the difference between their normal collar and the head collar, and modify their conduct accordingly.

    Furthermore, some puppies, particularly those not accustomed to putting on a head collar, dislike wearing it and paw at it, make an effort to rub them back or pull extremely. Should your dog exhibits this actions, the best technique is to help keep it shifting until it understands to simply accept the collar. A great option is to get the pet sit down by yanking high on the dog's mind.

    One more drawback to the head collar will be the reaction that many folks have with it. Lots of people feel that a head collar is a muzzle, and react to your dog as if it may nibble. Even though this is not necessarily a problem from the head collar, many individuals do discover it problematic.

    To conclude, training having a head collar is a lot like instruction having a coaching collar or some other equipment. Whilst the head collar is definitely an important and useful tool, it is essential to utilize it properly, stick to all bundle instructions, as well as blend its use with sound training strategies. The eventual goal of training your dog has a head collar must be to possess the pet to react as well with a typical collar as it does with all the specific head collar.
     
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think what you are saying here is to keep the dog on the move until he accepts the collar. This would definitely not be a recommendation from a force free trainer - you don't really want the dog to just 'give in' - see the Suzanne Clothier article I linked in my earlier reply, specifically the part about the dog who completely shut down when the head collar was used. If you do need to use a head collar, invest the time to train the dog to be comfortable using it.
    I don't know what you are saying here but yanking is never a good thing.
     
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    The post from Alexliu is taken from a website - I'm not putting the url here because it is full of commercial links, including '10 best e collars' and the like. Pure advertising, and nothing to do with giving good advice, IMO.
     
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  10. houseof_fraser

    houseof_fraser Member Registered

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    Not sure about whether technically you should use one to train but i used one on our collie mix who only needed to wear it as a ‘reminder’ once a week which quickly became never. I would sometimes just put it on him and then take it off so that he remembered to heal. He could be really badly pully but didn’t like the head collar so he would rather just heal himself than have to wear it.
    I think it’s a good tool for you if you are struggling to keep balance and don’t have time or energy to train at the moment. Every situation is different and if it’s going to make it easier to walk her then I don’t see why it would be an issue for either of you xx
     

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