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Help dog hates new puppy

Discussion in 'Dog Behaviour and Training' started by Ab1, May 19, 2021.

  1. Ab1

    Ab1 New Member Registered

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    Hi everyone, we got a new puppy and our older dog hates her, first time they so each other the older dog sniffed her for a second and tried to bite her straight away, ever since everytime she sees her she tries to get her, we can even put the puppy down, tried to with the puppy in her crate and let the older dog in the room to say hello and she just pounced on the crate, dont know what we are doing wrong, as anyone got any advice?
     
  2. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Hi there, how old is your older one and what breeds are they? How is your older one in general with other dogs? Have you had any dog coming to your house before? What signs of aggression does you older one show...is there 'lip lifting'...growling/barking etc? How old is your little one?

    What I would do...
    If there is any doubt with your older one not accepting the new comer.....you will need quite long introduction period before you let you older one close to your pup, even if there is barrier in between AND you will need to show much more fuss to the older dog so it doesn't feel that the youngster gets all the attention. That apply to any visitors...they should show attention for the older dog first before going all 'gooey' with the pup.
    Your pup doesn't know any better yet, so it won't miss/understand the fuss and the 'pecking order'. It is so easy to turn your back for the older one when there is super cute little one around....so you can imagine how that can create some friction.
    So take some steps back and start again and when you start letting the older one closer to the pup....make it so you make lots of encouraging noises so your actions show example that all that is happening is a good thing and do the introductions in short sessions so that they don't get over whelmed of each other which can turn into all manner of unwanted feelings and behaviour.
    I would not even let them at sniffing distance from each other but you could sit down somewhere nearby few times a day with your older one...tuck your dog under your arm and watch the little one doing its things together from a distance that your older one is comfortable with and it is able to behave itself..after while, give a massive praise for a 'job well done', maybe even a treat too and take it back to its comfort space away from the pup.
    If you are to succeed with the pairing...you might have to take it super slow and company each dog separately for time being so they learn to share the same house....eventually closing the distance and getting them to live together.
    But it is not necessary a done deal...some dogs never get on or accept other pets in the same house and there is nothing you can do about it. But ensuring you take it all slow...and give your older one more priority of your 'love'...there is a chance that it will all work out.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2021
    RGC and Hemlock like this.
  3. Ab1

    Ab1 New Member Registered

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    Our older is a border collie and she is 9 and our puppy is 9 weeks and she is a husky
    The older do is ok with other dogs she usually isn't too bothered about them
    We had a dog coming to our house but was ages ago
    If anyone comes to our house we always ask them to say hello to the dog first and then they can see the puppy after etc...
    My partner played with the dog while holding the puppy and she was so focus in playing that she didn't do anything but as soon as the play stops she tried to jump to get the puppy
    We are taking it very slow, sometimes I think if it will ever be ok, I dont even mind if they aren't best friends I would be ok with them just being in the same room at this point
     
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Sometimes two dogs, particularly two bitches, will dislike each other to the extent that one day, just when you let your guard down, they kick off and there's a serious injury. So deciding that this might never work and rehoming or returning the pup is a perfectly reasonable option - and arguably, better done while the pup is still young and easy to rehome.

    I'm not an expert so won't say it's what you should do, but it's worth considering it.
     
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  5. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Ah...there is huge age difference and that could become issue. She has had all those years to be the only one. I'm not expert with border collies but what I understand and what little experience I have with them (and I might be totally wrong), they can be bit funny with other dogs and if behaving 'well' they rather ignore them than interact with them.
    You often see BCs together but I can't recall seeing BC and other type of dogs kept together.
    I had one 'second hand' terrier that came from farm with two BCs and that terrier HATED BC when ever we came across one during walks...and I suspect it was the unsuccessful combination of dog breeds kept together why the farmer wanted to get rid of the terrier in first place.
    I don't want to sound so doom and gloom...but think of this introduction period taking several weeks rather than expecting much in so early on. Aim to create calm atmosphere when ever you try to let your older older one of watch rather than during play and excitement when
    her adrenalin is up as dogs can quickly switch from one extreme of behaviour to other when they are getting over excited.
    I'm also wondering about if it true aggression you are seeing, but maybe it is more of herding type of 'nipping' your girl is attempting to do? That is something you could train her not to do...
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2021
  6. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I have a BCs and mini poodles... and one of my BCs is convinced she is a poodle she looks out for poodles when out as she thinks they are the same breed as her ( bless her!)..... however yes generally breeds of dog love to play /be with same breed... when I got my latest BC one of the first things I do is teach the BC that the poodles rule as the BC get bigger and so they need to respect the minis or injuries could easily happen.

    In so far as issues with your BC and pup it matters how you introduce new pups/dogs to a resident dog and ALWAYS should be done away from the residents dogs house/garden
    As the BC is the one being reactive and leaning towards active aggression my advice is get the BC on a lead and let it trail so you can quickly step on the lead to gain control....and less of the excited play, you do not need to excite a BC as all you will get is excited reactive energy...so concentrate on calm teaching of tricks/obedience, teaching a job, making it earn its food daily using a kong daily not just delivered into a bowl...all those will engage the BC brain.
    As the crate was attacked then maybe that is where the BC needs to be, inside the crate while you can play/train the pup in safety...same as bed, swap the pups bed with the BC bed and watch to see how the BC deals with it...does it lay down, attack/shake it or refuse to go anywhere near it...that should give you an idea of what you are dealing with

    Walking builds pack mentality, so pup inside your coat, BC on a lead and walk, while the pup is small enough to carry this will start to socialise the pup with new sounds/sights/smells well before it is able to walk on a lead.

    Also suggest you take the BC to dog training classes ALONE so you remind her of obedience requirements you expect, it will also give her alone time with you, deplete her energy, using her brain so will make her a little more chilled.

    Pups can be a 'pain' and a certain amount of 'telling off' by the resident ( balanced/trained) dog should be allowed, it is part of the teaching/training and a follow on from the pups mother did BUT your BC sounds like it is going in for the kill and doesn't seem to care if you are there or not and that means more training with your BC and keeping the pup safe/separated ( but NOT isolated)
     
  7. CoCo2014

    CoCo2014 Member Registered

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    "Pack mentality*?
    Domestic dogs do not live in packs, their's is a loose association of the same species not a pack, the two are not the same.

    I've owned a mixture of breeds & non breeds from 1970, when I got my BC, previously we had only ever owned GSDs. Since then we have had Cavaliers, Bearded Collies & mongrels. Never seen my BCs get"nippy"with any other breeds/non breeds.
    I have never had a problem integrating a new dog/puppy & this includes bringing 9 month old puppies, who have been in quarentine for 6 months.into my home.
    However all my dogs have been socialised with other dogs from day one & as reward based force free trainer my dogs are all rewarded for good behaviour.
    I do train my puppies to accept crating to give the adults peace from the puppies attention & to ensure that the puppy has a sufficient rest.
    My current BC is 14 this year, my two mongrels are 7 & 6, 1 arrived as a 18 week old puppy & the other came aged around 18 months. My BC has only ever told off the two younger ones, when he's had enough of their antics & wants some peace & sleep. He only tells them off, he makes no attempt to bite or attack the other dogs, a bit like a grumpy old man.
    You cannot general about dog behaviour nor breeds, I had a GSD who preferred the company of Beardies, despite never having lived with one!
     
  8. Baranduin

    Baranduin New Member Registered

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    I vowed I would never have 2 bitches after a fight resulting in the serious injury of the older dog. It was PTS. it occurred when the younger dog became a teenager. The older dog used to warn her off and one day the young bitch went in for the kill. Take your puppy back to the breeder while it is still very young.
     
  9. Biker John

    Biker John Well-Known Member Registered

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    In my experience, a male / female pair do not fight, ok their can be the odd disagreement but normally the male gives in to the female. a pair of males can fight but not normally hard enough to cause real damage. But a pair of females, if they decided they do not like each other tend to fight to the death and nothing, apart from keeping them apart can stop them.
     

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