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How often do you give chews?

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by melb100, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    Aggie gets a frozen kong with yoghurt or peanutbutter in the afternoon and a dentastick in the evening to show its “settle Down” time.

    But I’m wondering how often you give your dogs “high value” chews, things like pizzle or pigs ears etc. She gets one of those maybe once a fortnight but are we being chew stingy?

    She’s not disruptive, has cardboard or an old flip chart pad if she wants to start chewing so we don’t need them to calm her or anything. But I just wondered if we are being mean and other dogs get something like that every day!!??

    Here she is on neighbourhood watch duty 61589312-A605-4C41-8D8E-D61B84741F5C.jpeg
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I give a chew daily - for dental hygiene.

    Dentastix are not as good for teeth cleaning as the adverts make out - i haven't looked at them for a while but one of the ingredients used to be sugar (disguised behind a chemical name).

    We like natural fish skin fatties, braided ostrich tendon and lamb skin, or a chicken wing - far better for teeth.
     
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  3. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Well...if is she is happy and behaving without giving more chews to chomp...then everything is ok and you are not stingy. On other end of scale...ours get chews everyday, often more than one. But some of ours they don't get 'through' in one sitting so they will be 'stashed' for another day when it takes their fancy again. But we need lot of distractions and 'brain massage' to help keep our young busy bodies in check or they start using each others ears as chews :rolleyes:
     
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  4. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Jasper doesn't get any long-lasting chews as he's an inveterate guarder. Which is a shame, but he's only got himself to blame;)
     
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  5. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Our lot have a lot of raw bones, some are very edible and others that are quiet hard last a lot longer (they get thrown away in the end)
    The only actual chew product that ours have are large cow hooves. These can last for years, I think the last round up I had I found 7. Just recently in the past couple of weeks a couple of the girls decided to get through 2 of them, it would have been better if the weather was warmer as I would have had the doors open to get rid of the smell, it was not too bad though.
     
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  6. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    Ooh thanks! We’ve got some hippy dippy dental sticks as my partner calls them, kale and carrot or something like that..
    Poor dog :rolleyes: :p
    I recently got a “pick and mix” bag of various animal bits to see what she likes and doesn’t set her tummy off. She loves pizzle, biltong tasty but gave her liquid poo for days. Not dared try the rabbit ears yet :D:D
     
  7. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    Haha we do have to get out the scented candle when She’s been on the pizzle :D
     
  8. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Mine gets the sort of raw bone that can be eaten in one go, such as a chicken wing or some venison ribs. She's a food guarder so we make sure she doesn't have anything to guard. She is also a great fan of raw broccoli and cauliflower. She gets these things every day.

    I don't use pet shop chewies as a distressing amount of them come from China and I am unhappy about the animal welfare implications as well as the noxious chemicals part. For instance, have you ever wondered why so much is coloured yellow? It's usually formalin.
     
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  9. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    Ah interestin, thanks. We don't eat meat in the house apart from partner has an occasional bacon roll so don't generate any bones ourselves from cooking. All her every day chew items are veggie as I also worry about the welfare implications (of pet food in general tbh) but hadn't even considered the chemicals. I would definitely buy an "RSPCA" or similar assured brand of pizzle and pig trotters etc if such a thing exists. ***Niche product alert for all you entrepreneurs***.
    Will definitely be trying her on the raw broccoli. I had completely forgotten my cat used to go mad for the stuff for some reason.
     
  10. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Do you have a local butcher you can get friendly with?

    Just for avoidance of confusion, cooked bones should never be given.
     
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  11. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    8A1C356A-FB4A-4672-BE45-AD4A4C78FCAD.jpeg Thanks Joanne, didn’t know that about cooked bones so good to clarify! Currently chomping away on Hemlock inspired luxury chew item: broccoli stalk
     
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  12. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Sprout stalks after the sprouts have all been picked off, brilliant for cleaning teeth.
    We don't have them very often but all of the dogs will have a go at them.
    .
     
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  13. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    ohoho we have kalette in the garden I've been trying to grow for basically the whole of lockdown (some kind of kale sprout hybrid). She will definitely be getting those stalks (looking forward to the doggy sprout farts already). That's such a great idea, thanks!
     
  14. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes, cooked bones can splinter and cause damage. Raw bones are less brittle, raw chicken wings are excellent as they are quite soft but still enough to gnaw on.

    For dental hygiene, I think the dog needs about 15 minutes worth of chewing (whether that's on a bone or anything else) to get much benefit.
     
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  15. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

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    Apologies for stupid question, so you only give them the raw chicken wing bone? Or the whole thing including the meat like you would get in a shop? (Spot the vegetarian who doesn't even know how to cook a sausage lol)
     
  16. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Give the whole chicken wing. You can buy them in bulk in supermarkets (being a veggie, the meat counters won't be familiar to you) separate and freeze. If you forget to thaw one/some out, my dog says they make good ice lollies.

    If you can stand the look of it (maybe wear dark glasses?!) whole trachea are brilliant for larger dogs. You can get them from butchers or pet food places - just make sure they are British.
     
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  17. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Any raw bones are fine, some are softer and more easily eaten, (just think "wild dog" "Wolf" or Fox ), everything they get is raw and never cooked, they are fit and healthy survivors.
    There are reports of dogs breaking their teeth on "weight bearing" bones. I wonder if this is because they have never had a good quality calcium or enough calcium in their diets, or maybe it's just bad luck !
    .
     
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  18. Pam99

    Pam99 Member Registered

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    Are these (chicken wings) ok to give to puppies? I'd like to try Ruby on them (shes a 4 month old boxer) but the OH says she shouldn't have either raw meat or chicken bones but hes certainly no expert...that said on sunday night she snaffled two large chicken thigh bones , gulped them whole, i was so worried about her but just fed her small and frequent portions for the next 48hours, i didnt even see ant trace out the other end so guess she must have processed them ok. Note to self, do not leave the food recyling bin on the floor even for a second:eek:
     
  19. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    @Pam99, raw food is fine for dogs - after all, wild dogs and wolves it it! Cooked bones can be dangerous though. Have a read of this article: Raw feeding
     
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  20. Pam99

    Pam99 Member Registered

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    Thank you Judy, your article is very helpful!
     
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