The Most Dog Friendly Community Online
Join and Discover the Best Things to do with your Dog

Welcome to Our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Introduction

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Jjohnd, Nov 15, 2019.

  1. Jjohnd

    Jjohnd Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    28
    There is certainly no shortage of space on Perranporth beach. It is easy to get cut off by the tide if you are careless. Wish it was open to dogs all year though.
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

    Messages:
    6,490
    Likes Received:
    7,931
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I thought Perranporth was open all year round? I think they are supposed to be on lead on the bit close to the town between July & August, but otherwise they are unrestricted: Perranporth Tourist Information - Dogs

    We had to be selective about the beaches we went to after Jasper managed to scale the 100-150' high cliffs at Holywell beach and then chased rabbits about on the headland.... that was scary, he has the braking distance of the Ark Royal....
     
  3. Jjohnd

    Jjohnd Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    28
    You may well be right about Perranporth. I will do some homework on it.
     
    JudyN likes this.
  4. houseof_fraser

    houseof_fraser Member Registered

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Hey,

    Good to meet you. Our lab will eat anything but he doesn't like tripe. So all dogs are different even Labrador's can refuse food (as hard as that is to believe hehe)

    Hatti
     
  5. Jjohnd

    Jjohnd Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    63
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Good to meet you also Hatti. Brooke is not too hard to please. We have not tried tripe yet as kibble is her main diet but I keep an open mind on variations to stop any boredom setting in. Do you or anyone reading this think that kibble is sufficient or should the dogs diet be varied?
     
    houseof_fraser likes this.
  6. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    4,848
    Likes Received:
    4,363
    Trophy Points:
    113
    All dog foods in the UK are required to meet nutritional standards so whatever you feed will be sufficient to meet her needs. But - and it's quite a big but - there is a wide range of quality. It's a bit like looking at the supermarket value ranges and the same meal prepared with top quality ingredients and made by a chef.

    At the end it the day if your dog is happy to eat it, does well on it in terms of body condition, and it's in your budget then there is no need to change it - obviously if you think she would like variety then of course you could choose to! But as new foods have to be introduced gradually by about 10 to 20 % a day to avoid tummy upsets, many folk don't bother as long as their dog is doing ok on what they already feed.

    If you want to add variety without a complete change it could be in the form of treats, or additions like veg if you want. My dog has a staple diet and regularly gets scrambled egg, cooked veg, fruit and various leftovers (and Mini Cheddars when he lets us take him to the pub ...)

    If it's something you are interested in, you could have a look at www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk

    It is an independent dog food comparison website which scores all types of foods (dry, raw, wet) out of 100. You can set filters for your dog's breed, weight, age etc. and for your daily budget; then you can add in any specific needs you have such as aiming for weight loss or avoiding specific ingredients. The website will automatically show the foods listed in order of what the assessors believe is best quality, and it also will show daily feeding cost (calculated from your dog's age and weight) so you can see what gives you best value for money. It has its limitations but it's a decent place to start.
     
    Ari_RR and houseof_fraser like this.
  7. houseof_fraser

    houseof_fraser Member Registered

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Personally we feed Eukanuba as standard and raw food for the collies but not for our lab. We do however, add vitalin muesli for fibre and then a small handful of another high value food (whichever is on offer in at least 15kg bags so they don’t change too much and upset their tummies). Basically our goal is to get the highest quality that we can afford in to them and for us that means having a mixture as we wouldn’t be able to afford some of the super expensive brands. Generally the more expensive the higher quality but of course that isn’t always the case. I think most dog owners will tell you that the search for the best food for your dog is a hard one as they all say that their food is the very best! Kibble and raw are both good for keeping teeth clean (raw because of the bone) and wet not so good for that. But at the end of the day it’s entirely up to you and also depends on how fussy she is. We also add supplements such as coconut oil and turmeric but some foods come with all this pre-added. Glucomsomine is great for labs as they tend to have Problems with their joints.
    The site Joanne mentioned is one we have used also to find ideas... the ‘all about dog food’ one.
    Hope you find something that’s right for you both, Hatti
     
    JoanneF likes this.
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    4,848
    Likes Received:
    4,363
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Raw definitely - kibble not so much because although crunching is abrasive, the carbohydrate sticks to the teeth and provides a feeding ground for the bacteria that cause decay and gingivitis.

    And -
    Great point - but yes and no. I can see why that would make sense but actually a lot of companies (ahem, Mars) spend a massive amount of their budget on advertising which pushes up the price dramatically without adding anything whatsoever to the quality. But - truly better quality foods look more expensive but give better nutritional value so you can feed smaller quantities. So what looks more expensive per gram can work out better value per meal.

    So while price can be an indicator, I think you need to dig a little deeper. :)
     
    houseof_fraser likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.