The Most Dog Friendly Community Online
Join and Discover the Best Things to do with your Dog

Welcome to Our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Jumping at other dogs

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by CMJ, Jan 28, 2021.

  1. CMJ

    CMJ New Member Registered

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hello all

    My 6 month old Yorkshire Terrier/Jack Russell pup is the sweetest boy ever and super soft but gets so excited when he sees other dogs (and humans but mainly dogs) . He's always on lead and I keep him super close but if a dog comes up to him he will jump up at it in excitement and I'm worried about him getting bitten.

    I took him to puppy class after his injections back in October (he was actually nervous of dogs then) and intended to do the follow on course but it was cancelled due to Covid/restrictions. I practice loose lead walking with him everyday and it can go really well but everything goes out the window when he sees another dog. He is not interested in me or treats at all and just pulls on the lead desperate to get to the dog. It seems to be getting worse at time goes on.

    He is really tiny (only 2.4kg) and I worry about him getting hurt with his over enthusiasm. We practice recall on a long line but I don't feel I could ever let him off the lead, as if he saw another dog he'd be off and also it wouldn't be fair to other dogs to have him jumping up at them.

    The only dogs we know are puppies, no calmer older dogs that he could spend time with (and it's hard anyway due to the restrictions)

    Just wondering if anyone has any advice. I'm hoping to get back to puppy classes as soon as things ease. :)

    I'm trying to add a picture but can't quite work out how to do it at the moment as it says my file is too big. I'll keep trying
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2021
  2. CMJ

    CMJ New Member Registered

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    3
    20210128_224942 (1).jpg Done :)
     
    Rinkydinkydo likes this.
  3. Rinkydinkydo

    Rinkydinkydo Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    359
    Trophy Points:
    63
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    4,551
    Likes Received:
    4,124
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I have some thoughts but before I reply it would be helpful to know if this ^^^ is all the time, or just when there are other dogs around?

    I would say though, you have him on a lead so maybe it would help to be firmer with other people about keeping their dogs away.
     
    Hemlock likes this.
  5. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    438
    Likes Received:
    325
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Aw a little Ewok ....
     
  6. Noodles

    Noodles New Member Registered

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    If it's getting worse I would suggest looking closely at how you are responding when you see another dog coming. Often we become nervous and our dogs take their cues from us, no matter how subtle we think we're being. The slightest tension is transmitted to the dog who then reacts more, and so the cycle continues. Victoria Stillwell has a ton of really good examples of how to break reactive behaviour.
     
  7. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,013
    Likes Received:
    883
    Trophy Points:
    113
    You are taller and can see further. When you spot an approaching dog, move yours to the side furthest from that dog, and walk to a distance from which your pup (what a beauty!) won't react. Don't say anything, don't do anything else, don't ask for a 'sit' just increase the distance until your pup is calm. You can retrace your steps or go to the side. Then stop and allow your pup to watch the other dog - if he reacts he's still too close. As the dog goes past (assuming it too is on a lead) reward your dog with whatever he finds rewarding. Thus his interest in the dog is allowed, but not diving at it because he is sufficiently far away for that not to be worthwhile.
    Practice moving away when there is no other dog too. Then pup learns the art and you become smooth at the move-away.

    This isn't going to disrupt his social life because we need dogs to be dog-neutral and ignore other dogs except for specific ones you have vetted and know will behave. Yours really doesn't need to meet and play with dogs, so you are not going to do him harm. He will grow out of this if you ensure his excitement levels are kept low by putting space between yourself and other dogs.
     
    Lennor Magill likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.