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Looking for dog breeds

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by SpotTheCat, Apr 7, 2021 at 11:58 AM.

  1. SpotTheCat

    SpotTheCat New Member Registered

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    In a few years I will be moving in to the country side, when I do my mother and I would like a sort-of-not-really-guard-dog basically just a large ish dog who has a protective instinct. I am trying to make a list of all the dog breeds which fit my situation or dog breeds that might.
    What I want in a dog breed
    • The most important thing is that I have 3 cats, one of them has mild cerebellar hypoplasia which means some times she struggles to run or jump
    • My mother wants it about Alsatian size.
    • Intelligent (that does not mean easily trainable, I want a dog how thinks for its self)
    • Needs to be able to get along with other dogs (we have one dog currently)
    • Needs to be able to go out happily in cold rainy weather
    breeds so far on my list (if you have any experience with the breeds I have listed I would like to hear it)
    • Belgian Laekenois
    • Rhodesian ridgeback
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    The risk with protective breeds is that they can tip very easily into protecting you against visitors, the postman, the gas meter reader... Or they might bark every. single. time. someone walks past. Personally I'd go for a breed that is more likely to slobber the gas meter reader to death but might look intimidating. A Rhodesian ridgeback might fit the bill there, but you could also consider Rotties or mastiffs. Or, if you're happy to go smaller, a Staffie (Staffies aren't always great with other dogs in general, but in my limited experience you'd be fine with bringing one in as a pup.)

    How these breeds tend to be with cats, though, I don't know. Again, you should be able to make it work if they arrive as a pup, but it's not always easy. And the fact that one of your cats might appear to be weak could be an additional factor there.
     
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  3. SpotTheCat

    SpotTheCat New Member Registered

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    Thank you!
     
  4. CoCo2014

    CoCo2014 Member Registered

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    I had GSDs for 50 years, from pure German bloodlines they lived(& were dominated) by a variety of cats over the years.

    Of the 2 breeds you mention, the Ridgeback is a hunting dog & not a protective breed, they can have a very high natural prey drive for small furry animals.

    The Laekenois is very rare breed even in Belgium it's native country. You would have to wait a very long time to find a suitable puppy in UK

    GSDs are not a guarding breed, they are a shepherding breed & as such, if bred correctly, form an unbreakable bond with it's family. They are good watch dogs & deter uninvited guests without even being seen. Why not consider a GSD
     
  5. Liamvv

    Liamvv New Member Registered

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    A Rottweiler, GSD, or Bull Mastiff would fir the bill. Large, powerful, territorial if allowed to develop those traits.

    As I say to everyone who buys a dog with a behaviour in mind is go and see a trainer that specialises in training those traits before even seeing the puppies. Ask questions, look at their dogs, think of all the potential negatives. Then speak to the breeders thoroughly and do the same as above.
    Then get the dog and follow their advice to a T because a territorial dog wont care if its your nan, or the next door neighbours child coming in to get the lost football.
     
  6. CoCo2014

    CoCo2014 Member Registered

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    GSDs are not a guarding breed & if the dog is to be a pet, it doesn't need to be protection trained by a specialist trainer. Basic training & brain "games" from day 1 is all that is needed.

    My GSDs were all Schutzhund trained so I could compete, not because I had to control their "territorial" instincts
     
  7. Liamvv

    Liamvv New Member Registered

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    Of course they are a guarding breed. they were originally bred to herd and guard sheep. That's why they work so well as police dogs and sport dogs. Their whole existence is to give them a guarding instinct, especially in the working lines.

    Also by the sounds of the original post it's not to be a pet. it will be kept outside "Needs to be able to go out happily in cold rainy weather" and the fact they want an independent dog not one that is trained.

    If you're advocating that this person go out, get a large breed dog, don't do any training, and just let any potentially troublesome or questionable behaviours go unchecked then you shouldn't be giving advice.

    Dogs can kill, especially big dogs, especially big dogs left to develop territorial resource guarding. However, even a bit of training to teach the dog a bark and hold and the escalation if the person tries to run will demonstrate to any legal court that you dont just have a dangerous dog that will bite anything, and not cleanly might I add.
     
  8. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    I would scratch the Ridgeback off your list. The one point it scores high on is “thinking for itself”.... the rest - hit or miss at best, and no self-respecting Ridgeback goes out in cold and rainy weather.
     

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