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Moss and his wonky legs

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Vambo, Feb 14, 2019 at 12:19 AM.

  1. Vambo

    Vambo New Member Registered

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    My springer spaniel Moss was born with wonky front legs. I adopted him from the RSPCA when he was about 6 months old. For all of his life his wonky legs did not trouble him. He was a really fast runner and not many dogs could keep up with him. He loved to run on the common and in the woods and he has been a very happy and healthy dog. He is now about 7 years old. About 3 weeks ago he began to limp on his left front leg. There is no cut or any foreign body in the paw. He can put weight on it. The wrist joint sometimes feels warm to the touch. After 4 or 5 days of no walks, the limp stops, so then I take him out. But then he starts limping again. I don't know what to do because it drives him crazy not being able to have a walk. I think most likely be has the beginnings of arthritis, which I am told he will get younger than usual because of the odd shape of his legs. I suppose what I am asking is, how long do you think I should be resting him? Are his running days over? And would a custom brace help? I know what you will say, I know I should take him to the vet, but for various reasons (he hates strangers) that will be difficult.
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I'm afraid I'm going to say what you will know we will say - he needs to see the vet, for his own benefit. If he's showing signs of inflammation, it needs to be treated one way or another. I know how difficult it is - my dog won't let the vet examine him - but it's necessary. You need to find an understanding vet, not one who insists on manhandling him, so don't be afraid to 'shop around'. The vet may be able to suggest something just from listening to your explanation and watching Moss walk.

    If necessary Moss could wear a muzzle at the vet, though you should accustom him to it first so it doesn't make the visit even more stressful. And if necessary, he can be sedated so X rays can be taken.

    The vet might want to put Moss on some long-term anti-inflammatories. It's not ideal for them to be on them long term because of possible health risks, but in Moss's case it may well be worth it to give him the quality of life he needs.
     
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  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Sorry but - yes, take him to the vet. There are things we can suggest of course like hydrotherapy (but that involves strangers too), golden paste and magnetic collars, all of which *might* help but a vet can give him a proper exam, and a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. If he hates strangers maybe your vet would agree to pop out of the surgery to meet him three or four times over a few days before the actual consultation.
     
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  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    @JudyN - we cross posted again!
     
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  5. Josie

    Josie Administrator Administrator Registered

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    Hello @Vambo - poor Moss, that’s tough for a springer.

    Firstly, agree with the above he should go to the vets.

    As well as going to vets, You could try him on CBD for dogs (they are on our directory) Jo sent us some to try for our boy who is 11. I did lots of reading and asked her lots of questions which she will happily answer before I decided to try it. Originally he was on Umove.

    It has lots of benefits and I really have noticed a difference with Den being on it.
     
  6. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

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    Does he have “Queen Anne” kegs Vambo ? ie; bowed ? One of my springers had this as a youngster and had damaged his growth plates through jumping from heights when his bones hadn’t formed properly ( try stopping a loopy Springer from doing anything ;)) he had an operation to rectify it by removing some bone and was fine after 6 weeks , still looked a bit wonky but was never lame again , never had arthritis and lived to just over 12 years old :rolleyes:
     
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  7. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    absolutly see a vet. for all you know the answer is a simple one or he could be in pain which nobody wants for their pet .
    Once you know whats wrong you can work on it.
     
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  8. Vambo

    Vambo New Member Registered

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    Thank you so much everybody for your thoughtful and caring replies. Incredibly, he seems much better today. And that's after a run yesterday where, joy of joys, he put up a pheasant. It was just like one of those paintings of working springers! But I will take him to the vet. And keep you posted.
     
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  9. Vambo

    Vambo New Member Registered

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    I meant to say - yes, it is Queen Anne legs he has. Apparently in Victorian times, most springers had legs like this.
     
  10. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

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    Ah bless him, certainly gives them character ;) hope all goes ok atbthe vets :)
     
    Vambo likes this.

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