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my dog not showing prove she can protect her self when the need comes

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by TEDD, Mar 31, 2021.

  1. TEDD

    TEDD New Member Registered

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    Thanks for the reply, what age do you think is perfect for advance training?
     
  2. JemimaGoldie

    JemimaGoldie New Member Registered

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    Is this some sort of warped joke? Worry? I would be more worried about you having a dog. Firstly, if you have told your dog to attack in the past, the other dogs will remember that and react accordingly. Secondly, if his tale is up he is not afraid. You are making your dog aggressive and fo no reason that I can discern. Why would you want your dog to be aggressive to other dogs? Why don't you want him to play nicely? Dogs don't attack for no reason, usually if they are afraid. A dog is not a weapon for you to play with; he deserves a peaceful existence and he deserves protection. I shudder at the idea that anyone would teach their dog to attack.
     
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  3. JemimaGoldie

    JemimaGoldie New Member Registered

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    Most people own a dog because they love dogs. They keep them for company, for love, not to attack and if he does bite another dog, a court could order him euthanised. They might also ban you from keeping a dog. As to being attacked in your home, most dogs will protect its owner, no matter its training; even my soppy Golden Retriever will do that. I don't know where you live, but if someone comes into your home with a gun or a knife, it is your dog who will be attacked.
     
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  4. JacksDad

    JacksDad Active Member Registered

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    may I suggest a bit of allowance for cultural differences and possible challenges with using the right words to express ideas when not writing in one's primary language.
     
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  5. Linz1012

    Linz1012 Member Registered

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    Very true about cultural differences, but I don't think the OP is suffering from a language barrier.
     
  6. JemimaGoldie

    JemimaGoldie New Member Registered

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    Dogs don't know about cultural differences; they know they're not happy being taught to fight everything on four legs. I am in England and we have very few places that are designed especially for dogs. I am fortunate enough to live not far from one and I spend a couple of hours every day watching fifteen or twenty dogs playing together, my own included. The OP's dog will never know that pleasure, because he/she thinks he is a weapon. It upsets me.

    Are you a moderator on this forum? If not, I don't see what it's got to do with you how I address another poster. To have a dog for protection and nothing else is animal abuse in my book, and I don't care a lot about cultural differences.
     
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  7. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    We can all contribute to make the forum a place people can post without fear of being judged and attacked, mod or not. Of course the cultural difference is relevant in how we regard animals - look how in the UK most people happily eat meat from pigs kept in conditions we wouldn't consider acceptable for dogs. People in other countries will have grown up with different expectations of the role of animals in society. Advice is welcome, but judgement and attacks are not.
     
  8. SaraE

    SaraE Guest

    Im sorry but in this case i agree with jemimagoldie, i dont think there is any language barrier he understand what were saying , there may be a culture difference and he may not see dogs in the same way we do here in the UK. From reading all his replies i also feel very sorry for this dog all he wants is for this poor dog to do is attack people who threaten him or mean harm to him but what about the dog why should she put herself in harms way to save you. Its your responsibility to protect you not your dog if you think someone will hurt you or break into your house then learn self defence.

    Thats what i did after i was threatened with a knife in my own home i got CCTV camaras and i learned how to defend myself. Im in the UK but i know some people in america will go to bed with a gun or knife as there protection. Dogs are not there to be your weapon to protect you. To me when the OP said if she cant bite to protect what is the use in owning a dog says it all for me he only wants her for that reason.

    And on the street dog thing , you should not be bothered if she cant self defend herself again you should protect her and to be honest if its neighbourhood dogs who are loose if you can report them if not then walk a different way stay away from them problem solved.

    It would help if we knew were OP lived so we could understand the culture differences
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 18, 2021
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  9. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I think the OP has had plenty of good advice, and it's been made clear that in the UK and the US, attitudes to wanting a dog to attack to protect itself and its owner, and what dogs are for, are very different to those he seems to hold, regardless of his country. That's all that's needed really.
     
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  10. SaraE

    SaraE Guest

    I agree hes had plenty of advice and our feelings on this.

    I only mentioned about were he is from because even here in the UK there are idiots who get certain breeds to protect them only , gang memebers come to mind. My brother is one of those idiots and hes in the UK and he got a German shepherd purley for protection only and when he got attacked on a walk and his GSD did nothing he gave him to a rescue and said hes useless hes not a proper GSD as he didnt protect me.
     
  11. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    That must have been very hard for you to see. Yes, even in the UK some people have very different attitudes :(
     
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  12. Linz1012

    Linz1012 Member Registered

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    I agree with you. Dogs might not know culture, they only know how they are treated, but culture shouldn't be ignored amongst humans.

    That's not to say we have to agree with what he's doing, or how he's treating his dog - far from it, but I think we do have to bear it in mind. What we think of as ordinary, or important, or even not worth noticing, can be the very opposite to others.

    That's what I said.
     
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  13. JacksDad

    JacksDad Active Member Registered

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    One can be technically proficient in a secondary language, but still not skilled at the nuances of word choices to convey meaning, ideas, intent etc.

    I do not disagree with the idea that we should make feeling/being protected our own responsibility, not that of others or our dogs. Personally, I wouldn't ask that of a dog. My dog and dogs I work with, whether they know it or not get the same promise...I will protect them.

    Rather tearing into the OP as an "awful" person for wanting to feel safe, why not help the OP have a better understanding of dog behavior, and to make more informed choices, more realistic expectations and possible other options. You might make more of an impact and change some minds if you do not start from a place of assumption that someone lives the life you do, has the choices/options you do, or is an "awful" person for not being like you.

    As for the quality of a dog's life tasked for protection work. While I might have disagreements with training methods, a dog that is suited for such work is NOT deprived of a "good life"...or at least doesn't have to be. Part of the reason they are suited for such work is they get a joy out of the work no different than pet dogs do from playing and having fun just chasing each other around. The reason, it is a game to them. They are not aggressive in the sense we often discuss trying to end around here, because they are not scared of the things they are confronting/dealing it. Their work is their "chase the ball" joy in life.

    This is also why just any dog isn't suited to such work. This is why simply getting a dog of a breed typically used in protection work does not in anyway ensure they will perform.
     
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  14. Linz1012

    Linz1012 Member Registered

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    Not sure of all of this is aimed at me,or just the top comment, but I have never made any comment at all about the OP other than disagreeing with you about language differences. I've kept my opinions about him firmly to myself, in fact I make no assumptions one way or the other. I haven't even got involved at all in debate about whether the dog is or is not suitable for protection work.

    The OP himself says on another thread that he understands English very well, and native speakers generally pick up when an OP is not posting in their first language - whether it's word choice or completely struggling with the language, it tends to be pretty obvious.
     
  15. JacksDad

    JacksDad Active Member Registered

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    other than the comment about language, no. rest of my post was a general response to the finger wagging in other posts that frankly came across very judgemental without taking into account differences in culture, experiences, knowledge, etc.
     
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  16. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    I am a native English speaker, and often find other native English speakers do not understand nuance in English, so I am always aware of that possibility.

    Equally, there are spheres where different people can agree to disagree. This is what makes conversation information. It isn't usually that one person is right and another wrong, just that we all come to situations and ideas with different life experience and skills sets.
     
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  17. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    Different cultures, experiences etc. approach works, but up to a point.

    There are cultures where dogs are considered food. While respecting diversity of experiences, I doubt I will be engaging in discussing recipes, for example.

    Where that “point of tolerance” is - probably depends on the person.
    If a discussion which started with trying to use an 8 months old pup to defend against a bunch of dogs in the street is uncomfortable or a bit frustrating (as it is for me), probably best not to engage. Since it can easily go beyond rational, perhaps into emotional territory - let cooler heads debate this topic ;-)
     
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  18. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    I cannot answer to that. Your best bet would be to contact such a training facilities and have a chat with the trainer. One thing to understand is that not only different breeds but individuals within them mature physically and mentally in different speed...so I would expect each dog is assessed for their suitability for such a specialized training.
     
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