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New member needs help pleasd

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Anna Thurston, Feb 1, 2021.

  1. Anna Thurston

    Anna Thurston New Member Registered

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    Need some help please.

    Got 3 dogs living in one house unexpectedly. My 1 Yr old Cockerpoo along withy son's 2 dogs, 8 Yr old lakeland terrier Cross and a 6/7 month old American xl bully. Been in house for 4 weeks now initially my concern was the xl bully being too rough especially when my puppy hurt his shoulder. Took him to my friends whilst I was at work so he could rest it. Now he is better the xl bully is a lot calmer with him and not quite as rough.

    What the problem, now I find that the Cockerpoo and lakeland terrier cannot be in the same room together without fighting and snarling at each other. There are young children in the vicinity too so this is not acceptable. 2 dogs even have bark collars on.

    I think I'm the problem because I knew the lakeland terrier when he was a pup and my son lived with me and both are trying to protect me. I'm at the end of my tether and very close to tears just constantly worrying.
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Are the lakeland and cockerpoo girls by any chance?

    Can you describe more about how the fights break out - cockers can have resource guarding tendencies, I'm wondering if any of that is going on?

    I can't imagine anti bark collars doing anything other than add more stress to the situation though.
     
  3. Anna Thurston

    Anna Thurston New Member Registered

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    All the dogs are boys. Anti bark collars were an available option from a friend of mine. The dogs just need to walk past one another. The Cockerpoo tends to growl a warning while remaining calm and still laying down and then the other one just flies at him. Sometimes it can be the other way around.
     
  4. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Oh dear...3 dogs bundled all of the sudden together and by the sound of it, they are trying to sort out their place and purpose in this group. I doubt it has anything to do with their relation with you but it is purely about themselves. Each of them have different kind of 'needs', not only because of the type of dogs they are but the ages come to it too.
    BUT, saying that....it is not impossible that they could not get on in the future...they will need to be trained to be together under same roof. They might never be good friends but they might learn to tolerate each other.
    This training could take some time and there is no miracle cures for it.
    If you can and have some space to allow each dog have its own area to chill, that would be good start. You will need to read their body language that as soon as there is indication that one of them is starting to react...guide the one that is source of the irritation to its own area and give it a nice chew to tackle and help it to calm down. Or effectively do same with them all. Calmer (and well rested) dogs tolerance levels are better than those that are stressed out..what ever the reason for the stress.
    Do not react to their behaviour with a punishment attitude but as 'a guide' to ease out the tension. You are to read and regulate their interaction and adjust accordingly to be ahead of the game and prevent any aggression rising. If have to behave as 'referee', then you are too late with your actions. Hopefully over period of time dogs will learn to recognize what they are allowed to do and what not and you set a routine for your daily life. Use basic commands like 'sit' to help you get by with one dog to go or do something else with other one...and don't forget to praise them either verbally that you are pleased with them behaving and/or with little training treat as you go by.
    Of course they will need their physical exercise too to get rid of some that energy that otherwise would be spent ways that could contribute to troubles between the dogs. If they do play together ok outside with more space around them...use that as a bond building exercise. Throw multiple balls them to chase...or maybe a frisbee? As long as all this running around does not create friction it will be great help.
    It is hard work for you (your family) and at first very intense training..keep you pockets lined with small training treats ..but it can be doable. Treat is as you would be training pups....but this time around their age is on your side, they've got working brains and they are capable figure things out...as long as they have will to put it in practise. ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2021
    JoanneF likes this.
  5. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    And to add....the American Bully might need extra activity, done separately. Maybe some rope ragging so it can really use its muscles and crastically limit its playing with others. You might need to teach 'be nice'...so it is gentle when being around smaller and lighter dogs. But you will need to be regulator and oversee that interaction all the time. Never leave the dogs to their own devises....things escalate and accident happen very quickly even if there is no aggressive intentions.
     
  6. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Please ditch the bark collars. It's like slapping a baby when they cry without addressing what their needs are. At best, they're just suppressing the noises, but their emotions are the same - or rather worse, because they can't express how they feel. And remember, a bark can be a warning - prevent a dog from barking and it may think its only option is full-on attack.
     
    Flobo, Ari_RR, Hemlock and 2 others like this.
  7. Anna Thurston

    Anna Thurston New Member Registered

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    The xl bully doesn't really have a problem with the fighting although he is starting to defend the lakeland terrier. Space isn't really an option because my son's dog are so used to being with him in the room. It doesn't help the it's a house of 3 adults, 3 children and 3 dogs all in a front room.
    The Cockerpoo is usually by my side too. The reason I think I'm the problem is my son is with all day when I'm at work and I come home and they start. I'm feeling like a stranger/intruder in my own home and so is my dog. The fighting was pretty bad tonight with one getting a cut lip and the other getting a cut paw.

    I really want to ditch the bark collars as I don't think it is working myself.

    I have sat down with both dogs either side of me and given them treats and love and they have been fine but as soon as you walk out the room, one will follow and then mayhem starts in another room
     
  8. Anna Thurston

    Anna Thurston New Member Registered

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    The lakeland terrier has been my son's dog since a pup and it has always been just the 2 of them. I'm the past 18months he has had to cope with several house moves with my son and now then his girlfriend and her 2 children and later a baby and then then xl puppy and had become a very growly/snarly dog which they have taken to be jealousy as he now has to share my son. Previous to my son moving out i was the one constant thing in his life and now I'm back in his life, is he jealous of my dog now too
     

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