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Puppy

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Debbie Smith-Wright, Dec 8, 2020.

  1. Debbie Smith-Wright

    Debbie Smith-Wright New Member Registered

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    I feel embarrassed to say I had a meltdown today . My Pup of 10 weeks and older dog of 2.5yrs play fight a lot and its making me feel stressed. It's sounds horrible and looks all teeth gnashing... I worry that its aggression? When will this ease and should I discourage it? Dogs are Dorkie (pup) and sausage cross Jack Russell /chihuahua.
    I do have a dog therapist visiting next week..... Never ever used one before. (Ive had several dogs in the past)
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Others will be able to give better advice than me about telling the difference between play and aggression, but I just wanted to reassure you that you don't need to feel embarrassed about having a meltdown with a puppy. I had one almost daily when my lad was at his worst!

    What you should look out for, though, is if they're taking regular pauses, maybe shaking off any stress while they do so, if there's playbows, and if they take turns to be the 'aggressor'. You could even video them in play and post the video on here if you like.

    Vocally, dog play can certainly sound as if they're trying to rip each other's heads off, so that's probably less of an indicator than body language.
     
    Dibbythedog likes this.
  3. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yep...learning to tell difference of play fight (flurry) and real aggression is something you will have to catch up with and since both of your dog have terrier in them...they will sound and look terrifying. I've never discouraged my dogs from having fun this way but with other dogs and particularly with different breeds it can be entirely different matter. Not all dogs take the rough play lightly and accept it....so be aware.
     
  4. Hal

    Hal Member Registered

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    Is either dog ending up hurt. If there are no puncture wounds then they are probably learning some good bite inhibition which will be valuable later on. Would it be possible to intervene really early (before they get too excited) and try and stop the game - then let them start again - so progressively train them to stop when told?
     
    Dibbythedog likes this.
  5. Dibbythedog

    Dibbythedog Well-Known Member Registered

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    Pups and Dogs can play rough. perhaps break it up when it gets too much .

    That's good you dig a dog therapist coming. It can be a bit of a minefield choosing a good one. If this one suggests any thing like pack rules etc and dominance then best to find another one.
     
    Hal, Hemlock and JoanneF like this.

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