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Questions about pug exercise and training

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by yadavrahul, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. yadavrahul

    yadavrahul New Member Registered

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    I have a silly squishfaced pug and recently started training him with a professional trainer. I take my fellow out for two walks a day of about 20 minutes each, one in the morning, one in the evening. The trainer said that this is too much for a pug — MapQuest that actually, some days, they needn’t be walked at all, provided they’re properly potty trained. She said this is because in the long term it’s bad for their legs. How often do you guys exercise your pugs? Rufus
    Also, has anyone else found housebreaking a pug to be a total nightmare? I’ve been trying for four months now and Lord Nibbler still has ‘accidents’ every now and then…UpToDate
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
  2. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    Hi there, I dont have a pug but I do know a lot of pugs and I can say that sadly the vast majority are grossly overweight. Some look like footstools.
    I think its great that you are trying to keep your pug active. Im not an expert on pugs but a fit healthy dog who is not overweight is going to have a much better quality of life than a coach potato slug. So I dont quite understand your trainer, as for going out each day while maybe not strictly neccessary yet again it adds to quality of life so Im all for it unless its really hot or sub zero in which case they might be safer playing indoors with a safe outside toilet break.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
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  3. Kara 1

    Kara 1 Active Member Registered

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    I agree with the above post ...our friends have pugs and they walk sometimes an hour in the morning and 30 min evenings ...they all have waists and are very fit ....
     
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  4. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    I absolutely don’t agree that less exercise is better for any dog, so long as they are able to tolerate the heat / cold, or have boots, a coat, etc, to protect the vulnerable areas of their bodies.

    In fact, I would say that 40 minutes every day Is too little, not too much. :)
    Pugs already have serious physical handicaps, & exercise to keep them fit and lean is the only way that I know of, to mitigate those congenital problems.

    Just as Dachsies need to be fit and lean to support their long spines, Pugs need to be fit and lean to compensate for their slit nostrils, accordioned sinuses, stenosis thru out their airways, and bad rear structure.
    We can’t do anything to compensate for their large shallow eye sockets, except to PREVENT them ever jumping from any height - including off the sofa, or off a bed to the floor.
    That means they cannot be allowed access to the bedroom, nor to the sofa or other upholstered furniture, when no adult human is in the room to LIFT the dog onto & off of the furniture.

    I’d recommend more - not less! :D

    - terry

    .
     
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  5. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I've never heard of that before - can you give any independent sources, please? I can't find anything on the internet but I'm trying to avoid coming across any graphic photos!
     
  6. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    Sure, @JudyN -
    Pekes, Pugs, & Boston (Bull &) Terriers are among a number of short-faced, big-eyed toy breeds who are pretty notorious, among vets & breeders, for dislodging an eyeball when they land on a hard surface from any height.

    Certain Dog Breeds Prone to Losing Eyeballs


    Protecting the Fragile Eyes of Short-Nosed Dogs Like Pekingese or Pugs


    Be aware the VetStreet article is 2 pages, they make U page thru vs post a “view all” link to make sure their readers page past ALL the ads. :rolleyes: I apologize for the aggressive sales campaign, but nonetheless, it is a good, trusted source.

    For emergency instructions on how to keep the eye moist & hopefully save vision, see
    What to Do if Your Dog’s Eye Pops Out of the Socket


    What can cause proptosis?

    - sudden jerks or sustained tension on a leash or collar
    The interior pressure of the eyeball can be significantly raised by a taut leash & consequent tight collar - even a buckle AKA tag collar, under sudden sharp tension or when the leash is tightly held, causes a rise in eyeball pressure.
    Glaucoma is one possible consequence; proptosis is another, & petechiae are a 3rd possibility. Petechiae are tiny ruptured vessels, arterioles, capillaries, venules, which show as thin red lines EDIT: or tiny bruises, in such delicate mucus membranes as tongues, eyelids, & the sclera of the eye (the white part of the eye globe).

    - trauma
    A fight, a blow to the head, a fall, or any other sudden acceleration or deceleration.

    - hard impact on a nongiving surface.
    Jumping from the sofa to the hardwood floor; falling off the bed to the carpeted subflooring... remember most beds these days have a 12 to 18 inch deep mattress over an 8 to 12-inch deep bedspring, & the bedspring sits a good foot above the floor, held by the bed frame.
    The bed surface can easily be 2.5-ft or more above the floor, & Pugs are only about 9 inches tall at the withers. :eek: Some folks use stairsteps to get into their own beds, so it stands to reason that if an adult human with an average 30-inch inseam needs a 2 step stool to get into bed at night, their tiny toy dog should not be allowed on that tall bed.

    Accidents do happen, but eye injuries to shallow-socketed brachy breeds are pretty predictable, & at least some of those accidents are preventable. :)

    Life with a cat or a young child can also predictably result in eye injuries to any breed with large or prominent eyes - scratches, corneal ulcers, punctures, etc, from kitty claws or toddler fingers are pretty common, in bug-eyed breeds.

    - terry

    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
  7. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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