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Scar tissue on pawpad

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Wonderwhippet, Sep 25, 2018.

  1. Wonderwhippet

    Wonderwhippet New Member Registered

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    Hi, my whippet had an infected corn on her toe and the vet says she is still lame because of scar tissue formation. Anyone else have experience of this and does it break down eventually please? Thanks for reading this post.
     
  2. Biker John

    Biker John Well-Known Member Registered

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    No experience myself but I would sugest seeing a sight hound vet, they will know much more than the general vet.
     
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  3. Wonderwhippet

    Wonderwhippet New Member Registered

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    Thanks Biker John
     
  4. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    Sometimes laser therapy can be used to reduce keloid scars - which is what I suspect the vet is talking about, as the cause of her lameness. :)

    I would second the suggestion of a sighthound vet, or if none are nearby, a canine orthopedist.

    I would also ask whichever specialist U consult, about home treatments that can augment laser therapy & other scar reduction techniques- such as aloe vera gel, an edible grade of thickish gel with NOTHING added but a small amount of preservative.
    Applied to the scar regularly, it can soften the keloid tissue & allow regrowth of new skin; U need a boot or sock or other device to keep it from being rubbed off.

    ETA:
    Aloe vera gel is packed in brown or green bottles, usually of glass, to protect the contents from sunlight, which degrades the enzymes & proteins.
    It should always stay
    refrigerated, once opened- to retain its freshness as long as possible & limit oxidation, open it by unscrewing the cap, then poke a pinhole thru the sealed mouth of the bottle, with a pin U previously STERILIZED using an alcohol wipe; discard the wipe, & use the pinhole to dribble the gel U intend to use into another clean container, such as a bowl, or onto a cotton ball, bandage, etc.

    Another excellent use:
    If anyone is
    burned at home, in the kitchen or workshop or at the barbie, immediately shove the burned area under cool RUNNING WATER until the burn is numb; then, pour the aloe gel straight over the burned area, direct from the chilled bottle.
    DO NOT TOUCH the bottle to the skin!, nor to anything else - only the gel pouring out, hits the skin, the bandage, the gauze square, etc.
    That habit prevents contamination of the “mother lode” in the bottle. :)

    - terry

    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
  5. Wonderwhippet

    Wonderwhippet New Member Registered

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    Thank you so much for that, I'm going back in a week and I'll see how things are. She is on a course of anti inflammatories now.
     
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  6. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    I edited my post above, & added some key info about how to safely store, dispense, & use aloe vera gel.

    It helps prevent scars, promote rapid healing and new skin growth, & soothes burns of all kinds (sun, fuel / flame, hot liquids, hot sticky substances, hot surfaces, radiant heat, STEAM... ).

    - terry

    .


     

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