The Most Dog Friendly Community Online
Join and Discover the Best Things to do with your Dog

Welcome to Our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Teach multiple cues or one by one?

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by melb100, Sep 12, 2020.

Tags:
  1. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Hi everyone,

    We have a 9 week old lurcher puppy who has settled really well. We've had her a week and really pleased with toilet training, sleep schedule, socialisation etc.

    My question is about training cues. At the moment we're trying to teach her to sit which is going okay - as well as possible with lurcher legs ;-). I'm also using and praising a recall cue around the house to try and get her used to this, and randomly rewarding calm behaviour now and then. I'd really like to start working on "drop" ASAP as well.

    However I'm not sure what the best timeline is - lots of info online about what and how to teach, but not so much on what order. Do people find their dogs learn okay with different cues (so you could have a session on "sit", one on "lie", one on "drop", spaced throughout the day?), or is it better to wait until they're really got the hang of one cue before introducing another one? Especially since I gather "sit" in the garden is one thing but then you have to teach it again in the kitchen, hall, etc.

    We've been trying to load the clicker for a few days but she still doesn't seem too excited by that. So I'm not sure if we've been confusing her trying to teach so many new things at once. Should we lay off the other cue training and focus just on clicker loading for a few days?

    All thoughts appreciated - payment picture below :)
    upload_2020-9-12_14-32-53.jpeg
     
  2. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,195
    Likes Received:
    1,107
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I think learning curve is totally individual for each dog and we have to adjust to how they response. Some commands may sink well in when they are combined, say...'sit' and then following with 'down'.
    If the pup shows that it doesn't seem to pick up something, then maybe it is bests approach to take one 'trick' at the time.
    But take your time...it is only a tiny thing and still developing all of its life skills..it is lots and lots to take in. You are in no hurry to get it to master these things quite yet...one week in a new surroundings is VERY short time and to get it to learn just 'sit' for now is quite plenty to start with.
     
    melb100 likes this.
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    4,700
    Likes Received:
    4,256
    Trophy Points:
    113
    If you want to use the clicker, I'd have a couple of days just loading that because that's going to become your basis for everything else. Have a look at this thread and see if anything helps Training with a clicker

    Is your reward high enough value?

    Then maybe teach just two things to start - recall, and drop.

    I'd lay off the 'sit' if you think her legs are too lurcher-y. She may find it uncomfortable so is it really necessary?

    Make sure your training is short - like the time to boil a kettle. And fun - so I think if it was me I'd be playing hide and seek to teach a recall, with a fun party when she finds you.

    And for 'drop', check this video.

     
    Ragsysmum and melb100 like this.
  4. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I make sure i get house training underway first and then i have always let my lurchers be puppies for a while before training ....alot of lurchers dont sit comfortably and often lay down instead of sitting ....
    Do you know what mix of lurcher you have ...
     
    Ragsysmum and melb100 like this.
  5. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Thanks Tinytom! She's a Bedlington whippet x saluki. Absolutely beautiful and you can already see a bit of lurcher bonkersness in the evenings :D
    As expected with any puppy, no surprise that she loves to chew! Trying to sub in Dog things for Human things whenever she grabs hold of my watch strap/ the table leg/ handles on the bedroom drawers (her latest discovery), but partly for this reason Drop is quite high up my list.
    House training is going really well, we're in a first floor flat but took last week off work between us so that one of us could focus on playing with her and carrying her downstairs to the garden every hour or more. For the last few days she's been going towards the door to let us know, or else doing a little whine during the night. Hence I'm thinking that maybe we could introduce a few more cues now.
    So excited to have her in our lives, cannot wait to see her develop over the next few months. I swear she is getting bigger every day!
     
  6. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Thanks Joanne, that clicker training thread is really useful. I will definitely try the 5x5 for a couple of days. Also the tip about boiling the kettle. We were doing a few short sessions but not as short as that.
    And the drop video is great. I had actually just watched that from another thread that someone posted it in, that's partly what made me wonder if it would be confusing to introduce that alongside "sit" and the clicker.
    Thanks so much for your useful replies.
     
    JoanneF likes this.
  7. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Thanks Finksy. Partner and I were joking we dont want to be those pressure parents sending their kid to Chinese lessons, then violin, then swimming (competitive), extra maths tuition, etc. Need to make sure there is plenty of play and cuddles in between all the napping. ;-)
     
    Biker John, Finsky and Hemlock like this.
  8. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    365
    Trophy Points:
    63
    You are a brave person taking on those three mixes ...or maybe a bit bonkers:D:D:p:p:p:p:p
    Please keep posting lots of photos ;)
     
    melb100 likes this.
  9. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,133
    Likes Received:
    970
    Trophy Points:
    113
    As one who has owned quite a few lurchers, I'd say work on recall with lots and lots of rewards, as that is the most important thing ever with lurchers, and teach 'swap' rather than 'drop'. But don't put pressure on pup, as they don't tolerate it well, and keep sessions really short. If she gets it right once, that'll do for that day.
    Work on you being her best friend, the person who shows her things like scent trailing in the garden, and working together on finding tiny treats you have hidden. Cardboard egg boxes, loo roll middles and kitchen roll cardboards will be good for this.
     
  10. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

    Messages:
    6,112
    Likes Received:
    7,591
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I have no advice to add, but rather than payment in a single photo, could we have it in instalments, please? Say once a week? :) I can't decide whether Beddie/whippet/saluki is my dream cross or my nightmare, but she's going to be fun!:D
     
    melb100 likes this.
  11. melb100

    melb100 Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    101
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Hahah thanks everyone!

    I will focus on recall and the games/bonding.

    I’ve always loved Beddlington whippets, we were looking to rescue for ages and saw a very few but unfortunately there were always issues we didn’t feel able to address e.g. one only liked men, another one who didn’t like men, one who had bitten several different owners “for no reason”.

    I actually still feel a bit guilty for getting a puppy as we both grew up with rescues and always imagined We would get one. So that probably feeds into being very conscious to train her well and “justify” the choice of pup v rescue. Just need to remember that is my issue not the pup’s and try not to pass on any anxiety or pressure.

    The dad is actually saluki greyhound cross, remains to be seen if that makes any difference!! Although she has been incredibly laid back and calm around all the new household noises, tv, drilling on the road etc. There’s just a very zoomy hour every evening :D Mind you we almost adopted a wolfhound Labrador cross until the owner ghosted us so we,re obviously gluttons for punishment!

    I think weekly photos can be arranged ;-) here she is enjoying a footstool, her latest preferred nap spot. Enjoy it while you still fit there darling puppy!!

    9C487A48-D142-4EE9-93F6-686746384B2E.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2020
  12. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,133
    Likes Received:
    970
    Trophy Points:
    113
    What a gorgeous pup! And she will grow into a stunning dog.

    Re: the pup vs rescue thing - we all have to get the right dog for us at the time. There are always people who will try to guilt other people into doing something, then bask in reflected virtue. Ignore them - it's a kind of hobby and those sorts of people are never there to pick up the pieces when it all goes wrong. No matter if you have a pup from new or a rescue, you have given a dog a great home.
     
    Lennor Magill, RGC, melb100 and 4 others like this.
  13. Jan Woodhall

    Jan Woodhall Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    28
    OMG my brain hurts! Goodness me what a lot to teach a tiny and young brain! Ive had my puppy 7 weeks now he is just 5 months old and I am delighted he remembers to sit and wait without being requested to now! LOL :) Good luck with yours :)
     
    melb100 likes this.
  14. Rinkydinkydo

    Rinkydinkydo Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    359
    Trophy Points:
    63
    It is possible to train them,I've had them retrieving to my hand at 14/15 weeks old. Recall,retrieve and release,but it's all done within puppy play. So it is possible but I am experienced training working dogs. For me the best thing you could work on is recall with a lurcher. Anything that can go from zero to 40mph in a blink of a eye you need to be able to recall it.
     
    Biker John and melb100 like this.
  15. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

    Messages:
    6,112
    Likes Received:
    7,591
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I think it's about giving them the opportunities, and seeing how they respond, rather than giving them 'schooltime'. It's like looking at a picture book with a baby and saying the words that are printed in large letters under the picture. You're not teaching them to read, but you are giving them the opportunity to make the connection between the picture, the sound, and the printed word. Or giving a very young toddler crayons and see if they come up with something other than a scribble. It's all still play.
     
    melb100 and Finsky like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.