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Discussion in 'General Discussions and Lounge' started by Josie, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Last two nights have been good introduction for fireworks for our youngsters and dogs weren't too bad with it at all...I'm actually surprised how well it has all gone...so far! :rolleyes: In fact they took the banging and lights better than our next door's 14 year old prat and his friend's behaviour(left on their own for few hours), when they decided to taunt our girls during their toilet break in our garden. But what those little prats didn't realise that I was out there too and could see what happened. They thought it was good laugh to get our dogs bark a lot more than they would have otherwise done :mad: And rather than doing the normal 'shushing' the dogs to quiet down....I let them bark at them and I stepped under the lights and looked at them barking and laughed at them back. Lads soon found out that they didn't like all that noise. I now suspect that it might have not been first time as it has always been bit weird that our girls do not like him and always get loud when ever he is around.
    Yes, I realised I lowered myself to their level, but still...it gave me a great pleasure to see them be surprised and close their window and curtains and be on their business...no doubt playing their puter games :rolleyes: That lad doesn't normally utter a word to me, nor he bother to shush his own dog when it is barking daily...for hours! He was being a 'big man' in a company of his friend...as teenagers do :rolleyes: But I will get the last laugh, when next time I see him and I shall be SO nice to him and 'innocently' ask if he had lovely time at bonfire night....no doubt his mum will be next to him as well ...:D:D I might be 'old' in their eyes....but I still have perfectly good sting in my tail and I know how to use it too :D:D
     
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  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    It's Mr N's first day back at work today after the Xmas break, i.e. up in the spare room. I'm just back from afternoon walk with Jasper, who spent a good 10 mins barking in the front room before I realised what the problem (probably) was - 'Daaaad, you need to come down here and drink port in front of an old film!' - which is what he's done every single afternoon for about a week!

    He's been lured into my study with a treat now, and has finally decided that he'll have to make do with me.
     
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  3. RGC

    RGC Active Member Registered

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    Your husband epitomises savoir faire. Brilliant. Respect all round.
     
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  4. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    I had to admit that despite how much I love my dogs, having our youngsters around haven't always been plain sailing....they do test your patience! :rolleyes: But every now and then things shift in their development that is not only a miracle to witness but also SO rewarding.
    One of the youngsters have always been much easier to teach and cope with than the other one, but now that girls have had their second season, during that there has been change of gears...our 'difficult one' changed over night and I woke up one morning to pair eyes with of more mature dog looking through them :eek: All of the sudden she was much more chilled, decisive with her reactions, there was evidence of clever brain activity to be seen and she started to indicate more clearly her wishes to go to garden 'for personal business'...etc. Like a different dog! :eek: 'Sigh'....it has been a LOOOONG year but now all the hard work with them is really starting to pay off.
     
  5. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    That's such good news. Just shows how having their season brings them on, and why they shouldn't be neutered (either sex) too early.
     
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  6. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Exactly so. And suspect there is many dog owners and veterinary professionals that never get to witness it to realize how important those hormone levels and changes really are.
     
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  7. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    And talking about 'how things change as they get older'. WELL...we are just back from walking and on the way we stopped to chat with few neighbours. So far our 'troubled one' has never been keen to meet other people, par couple of exceptions to this rule :rolleyes: But with her newly found confidence she was keen and wanting to investigate all these people she has been previously always given few warning growls to keep off.....now she loves the fuss! :rolleyes::D There is the 'other dogs issue' that we will continue working on...............:rolleyes:
     
  8. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    One of the good things about having a dog... I've just had a routine MOT and service at the doctor's, and the practice nurse told me that I had what she calls 'dog walker's blood pressure' - i.e. excellent for my age :) So keep on walking, folks!

    I can't help thinking that she hasn't been on some of the walks I had with Jasper when he was younger and wilder... I dread to think what they did to my BP :D
     
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  9. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Ah...but those 'younger days walks' only made you stronger and more resilient...like putting money into the bank ;)
     
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  10. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I'm sure they were responsible for more than a few grey hairs though!
     
  11. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    LOL....at least grey hairs do not cause lasting damage...bit of dye sorts that out. Anyway, when I studied to be hairdresser..we were told not to use grey hair-term with clients but instead say 'natural high lights'. So that is what you gained....lovely natural high lights ;)
     
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  12. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I bit the bullet over the last few years and stopped colouring - when I look in the mirror, I see blonde highlights, when I see myself in photos I see grey. I also let it grow over lockdown, and discovered that it had naturally thinned - but my hair was so thick and bushy before, this was an improvement. Finally, I have the long sexy (albeit grey) tresses I always dreamt of... a bit bloomin' late! Still toying with the idea of bright purple highlights or ombre... just not something that needs constant retouching.
     
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  13. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    I like to use the word 'silver'...:D sure the silver bits will take a colour really well, go for it!!
     
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  14. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    This is a revelation. My hair fell out. I find it really distressing. And all along it was because of owning lurchers and terriers, not the menopause at all!
     
  15. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    I could feel my longish hair starting to get thinner after a certain age,( or maybe due to the years of walking special dogs:rolleyes:) which I didn't fancy, so I just shaved it off!!:D Not quite all though, a number 4 seems to suit with a few wispy bits round the edges. What I have actually feels quite thick now and I don't have to worry about it!:cool::D
     
  16. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Plus you could dye it really wacky colours and if it's a disaster, it won't take long for it to grow out!
     
  17. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

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    I was a natural blonde for years ..then at 24 started to dye it ...all different colours ....i have kept my hair short for years as my hair is naturally curly. ..
    Two years ago i had a reaction to bleach on my neck line (hairdresser had used same mix forever) hospital said it was equivalent to a bad chemical burn ...never dyed my hair again ...my hair is now dark grey with silver highlights. ..i do miss my blonde hair ....
    I have kept it to a short pixie cut with a blunt frindge but now am growing it a little now as my usual mad curls have turned into soft waves. ..could this be the menopause. ...
     
  18. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    The technical term these days is perimenopause, which can actually go on for a quite a few years where you can experience all sorts of changes:eek:... I drink herbs, lots and lots of herbs, to help balance out my crazy, I mean hormones...! You are officially in menopause when you have not had a period for 12 consecutive months... sorry... too much information maybe!!:oops::D:D:D
    @Tinytom love a pixie cut! (quick change the subject!:rolleyes::D)
     

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