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Training to go on the lead

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by gruffalo h, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. gruffalo h

    gruffalo h New Member Registered

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    Our puppy is 8 weeks old and we thought it would be a good idea to get him used to having his lead on in the garden rather than leaving it until he is ready to go walkies, trouble is, he hates it, he cries, jumps up at the lead, chews it and lays down and refuses to move (all complete with sad puppy dog eyes). We use treats and try to make it fun for him but he really hates it, any ideas on how we can help him get used to it so when we do get to take him out it won't be a total nightmare.

    harry August 2013 005.jpg
     
  2. Rocky Rescue

    Rocky Rescue New Member Registered

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    Do you have a light weight training lead to pop on him when around the house, just let him trail it behind him while he walks around.

    Try to be persistent he will get used to it eventually. When he goes to chew it give a firm NO

    Maybe also try putting a very small smear of Vicks vapour rub on the lead to detere him chewing it, this does work.
     
  3. gruffalo h

    gruffalo h New Member Registered

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    Thanks Rocky rescue, will give that a go :)
     
  4. jayelew

    jayelew New Member Registered

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    We have two lurcher pups, Iitter brother and sister. They were 11 weeks old when they came to us and are now 14 weeks. They have settled in really well, they have accepted a crate, will go in on command and often go in of their own accord when they feel like a time out. They eat well and have had no tummy upsets. (we followed the breeders instructions at first and have made all changes gradually.) We are having few problems with house training. In fact everything is going well.

    Now they have finished their vaccinations and are able to go out and start socializing we have begun lead training. Jac, the dog pup, has taken to it like a duck to water but his sister, Nia, hates it. She just digs her back feet in, stands their shivering and refuses to move a step. Nothing will coax her, not even her favourite tit bits. I have left her with a light lead on about the house and she is fine. She will even walk with me holding it. Outside it is a different matter.

    Things haven't been helped by the weather, but we do put coats on them if the weather is bad. I know it isn't a major problem and that we will get there with Nia, eventually, but I am so looking forward to taking them both for walks. Is there anything we have missed? Any additional tips would be appreciated.

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  5. Jo*

    Jo* New Member Registered

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    My puppy was the same when I first took him outside on a lead in the garden, and he's still a bit funny on walks now, and will just sit down and not want to go anywhere, it's just perseverence I think! X
     
  6. jayelew

    jayelew New Member Registered

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    I think you are right.

    Today I tried taking Nia out on her own, thinking she might do better if Jac was not about. Things were no different. She wouldn't budge.

    She is so responsive in other ways. 'Sit', 'leave', 'bed' are all obeyed in a flash and 'down ' is getting better.

    Never mind. I am sure we will get there.
     
  7. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    Do they wear a collar at other times or is it just the lead they are objecting to? If they only wear a collar when they have a lead, then I suspect it's as much the collar as anything else.

    As someone else suggested get a cheap leash or longline and get pup used to wearing it loose round the house, then the garden, then pick up it every so often and do some training with it in your hand.

    Clicker training is a really good way of teaching them what you want or expect. You can easily do this (once you have taught them what the clicker is about (there are great youtube videos out there, but personally I'd recommend a good trainer/training class) by clicking and rewarding each time they take a step or two forward. Then a few more steps and so on working it up till they're walking in the direction you want them to go.
     
  8. jayelew

    jayelew New Member Registered

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    Thankyou for your suggestions.

    In answer to your questions, both pups wear a collar in the house but only when they are supervised. We don't leave collars on them when they are unattended. Neither of them shows any objection to a collar. I do leave Nia with a loose lead on to play about house. She doesn't mind at all and will let me hold the end, and even lead her a bit. But only in the house. Outside she just closes down, although she plays outside regularly without a lead.

    We have both the pups booked in for puppy training and socialization, starting tomorrow evening. We have always had dogs and have trained many pups over the years, but have never used any method exept a reward system. The class we are booked to take them uses this system too. However, I would be interested in clicker training, I have never used it and know nothing about it. Can you recommend any good websites or other articles where I can learn more? (I am assuming it doesn't require any "crime and punishment" regimes like some people used to use in days gone by. Probably some still do, but this would not be for me.)

    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Jaye.

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  9. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    Aargh I just wrote a huge long answer and it's disappeared on me

    Clicker is as positive reward based as you can get. It builds on the type of training you are already doing, but makes it easier for the dog to understand what you are asking for as the clicker can mark the exact moment a behaviour happens while with treats alone sometimes the treat gets there too late and you accidentally reward the wrong behaviour.

    As an example before I learned the clicker I wanted to teach my dogs to bow but never could because by the time I got the treat to them they were already in a down (bow is halfway to down). Once I started clicker training they learned it in about 5 minutes. Click in that split second their butt is still in the air and then it doesn't matter if they're down when the treat comes. A few more times and they start to hold it on the air longer. If they don't stop clicking and rewarding. They will twig that they got the click in the air, so start again click with butt up, expecting longer times in the air till they keep it there. They learned the concept in about 5 min, but of course needed a few refreshers for it to stick.

    It is completely positive and designed so that over time the clicker and treats are phased out.

    Google Karen Pryor clicker training. here's a link to her clicker -the best designed one out there - and a small quick trick book which gives you a quick overview http://www.traininglines.co.uk/karen-pryor-click-a-trick.html

    Also google Susan Garrett clicker training. She does some great videos on YouTube and through her website. You'll want to look up 'loading the clicker' so the dog associates it with rewards and then move on from there.

    Hope this helps. You can teach really complex things as well as the simple things. I think watching a few clicker training videos on YouTube will show you what a world it opens up, and the dogs LOVE it.

    Wendy
     
  10. jayelew

    jayelew New Member Registered

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    Thank you Wendy. That sounds most interesting.

    My pups went to their first puppy class today. The person taking it also does agility to a high level and is in favour of clicker training but it not actually including it in this basic puppy class. We were very please with Jac and Nia. They behaved well, were friendly with all the dogs and people. Jac carried out his few little exercises reasonably well, except for recall. Nia was not very good at any of it but she was enthusiastic and really enjoyed it, and when we came out of the hall I managed to walk with her up to the end of the pavement and back again to the car, on the lead. No holding back at all. :thumbsup:

    I had a bit of a difficult time myself tonight. Silly really, and I felt such an idiot. I lost my GSD girl a few months ago. She was so special and I still miss her so much. When a lovely little GSD pup came into the hall my heart stopped and the tears came. I had to go to to the 'ladies' until I got myself under control. After the class, when the pups were just socializing with each other, Nia struck up a friendship with the GSD pup and the two of them played until we left. Strangely, this sort of helped me quite a lot.

    Anyway, I am well pleased with Jac and Nia for their first time.

    Thanks again for you information on clicker training.
     
  11. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    Glad it went well :) . Even if not included on the official class training I'm sure you could pick their brains for some tips.

    And not silly at all feeling emotional seeing the gsd pup. It's been just over a year since we lost our special girl and I still get choked up by some of the (seemingly) strangest things. It's a testament to how much we loved them.
     

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