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Transporting a dog safely

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by forestboy1978, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    I'm a gardener. I take my dog to work with me everyday and practically every time I leave the house she comes with me. In the past she traveled in the boot or as the car was wrecked anyway often on the passenger seat.

    I've literally today bought a panel van. Large van. Vauxhall vivaro. I like the dog in the front so she can look out the window as I know she enjoys it. However this is a nice van and I've decided I'm going to keep it nice so I've temporarily put a bed in the back. Of course space is not the issue and she doesn't mind the dark but I'm worried about having to slam on the breaks or having an accident. I haven't yet put tools in it but will and stow them securely but how to stow the dog.

    I thought about a crate and placing it on strong hooks in the floor so the only way it would slide is if you pull it backwards towards the rear doors. I.e it can't go left right or forwards, or even backwards unless it was lifted and then pulled backwards.

    She's 30 kilos btw

    Any input would be fantastic as I want to get this sorted ASAP.

    Cheers
     
  2. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    I would definitely crate her, and secure the crate so that it can't move. I cringe when I see dogs in the front seat as I have visions of them going right through the windscreen when slamming on brakes, even with a seatbelt. I used to travel with my dogs that way, or loose in the back. After a friend had a horrendous accident where he was almost killed and his dog was (he normally crated, but the rental car was too small to accomadate the crate), I have used a strong seat-belt at the very least, but crated if at all possible.
     
  3. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Yes I think you are right. Thanks

    Btw I was always aware of her in the front without a seat belt on and always kept well away from the car in front but it was always on my mind. I've been driving 11 years and never had a single accident, touch wood, but yes I do know what you are saying. It would destroy me to see her suffer like that, worse than if she just died quickly in the accident which is unlikely. She's such a little friendly poppet!
     
    chelynnah likes this.
  4. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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  5. eingana

    eingana Do my ears look big in this? Registered

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    I always advise people with a large van to find a way of making a secure (and secured) space for a dog to be because there's way too much space for them to end up being bundled about in the back if they're in there. It's not a 'lovely big space' for them to be in because they can't predict when you're pulling away or braking and adjust their body position accordingly so they will just constantly end up losing their footing and that just opens them up to being hurt.

    That crate looks fine, as long as it's secured properly. If the van is floored out with plywood then it's really easy to screw down battens to the size of the base of the crate which will stop it slipping around and you can then run small straps over the top of the crate which are secured back down to the battens, or build a frame up from the battens to enclose the crate and provide a plate over the top. Can I suggest that for a top plate you set that up a good few inches over the crate and allow plenty of air flow so that she can reduce her temperature on hot days or after a run around?
     
  6. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    I am thinking along similar lines as you. I figured 2 pieces of battening either side of the cage/ bag and ratchet strapping it down to stop it moving in any direction.

    The side and top barrier you mention can be made to fit a few inches above the top but not from the side as space is limited by some shelving that the side barrier will be fixed to. I've sat in the back of the van on a hot day with the doors closed and it's nice a cool though. It is a slight issue that you have raised as I want to stuff a pillow between the other side of her cage and the bulkhead so if the brakes are slammed she has cushioning. This might not be needed as the bulk head does not go straight down, it kinda curves away from the side of the cage so the fabric of the cage should not allow her contact with the bulkhead. Hmmm!

    I'm going to work on it tomorrow or Sunday. I'll take some shots for feedback.

    Thanks
     
  7. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Work in progress! Will build the ply surround tomorrow or Monday.

    20140816_1507321.jpg Work in progress! Will build the ply surround tomorrow or Monday.
     
  8. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Finished!

    20140819_125322.jpg
     
  9. eingana

    eingana Do my ears look big in this? Registered

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    That looks a nice sturdy and safe way for your little one to be transported- well done :)

    She looks perfectly happy in there too.
     
  10. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Looks can be deceiving. She hates it lol!
     
  11. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    Great job. I know she thinks she'll prefer being able to see out and watch the world go by, but you know she'll be safer in there now.
     
  12. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Yeah cheers, she's getting used to it!
     
  13. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Knock on effect to this is there's no heating in the back. She's old now and shivers in the mornings even in the summer so she needs to be heated for sure in winter.

    I've bought her a better coat than her original. Seems pretty decent!

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/261357658268?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&var=560259799574&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    But I don't think it will be enough in the dead of winter. She really hates the cold. So I bought her a hot water bottle as ridiculous as it sounds. It's covered with a furry cover but I'm wondering if cooped up in that space with a coat and a hot water bottle she might get too hot? How to tell?

    If that's the case I'll just use it for when it's raining and she has to remain in the van on her bed that's tucked down the side of her cage. That and a blanket should keep her warm enough for the rare ocassions when she has to stay in the van. Rain, unaccommodating customers, other dogs etc. etc.

    She's only confined in the cage itself for maximum 45 mins at a time when actually travelling. Usually 20-30 mins!

    The trouble with that dog is it never makes a sound. Doesn't bark. She does whine though but only for pointless things, not when it would make sense to make herself heard.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 22, 2014
  14. eingana

    eingana Do my ears look big in this? Registered

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    I think I'd reserve the hot water bottle for the depths of winter and just make sure that there's a good thermal bed in the base of the crate. A piece of a memory foam mattress topper (doesn't need to be more than a couple of inches deep) is very good at cushioning old joints and is also a good insulator.

    Top that with a fleecy blanket and you've got a lovely warming bed that can stay year round (and the fleecy blanket can go in the house for a wash when necessary) then you can really ramp up the insulation for winter with a cut up camping mat, the sort that is really dense closed cell foam, waterproof and windproof, slid around the inside of the crate around her sides to make sure that she's got no cold draughts. If you buy camping stuff at this time of year you can get some amazingly good deals and these mats are usually only about a fiver anyway.

    Then when it's raining or really cold you can bring in the hot water bottle and she will really feel the benefit with the insulation around the crate to reduce the heat loss from the hottie too :)

    Oh, we do go to some lengths to make things right for our beasties, don't we?
     
  15. chelynnah

    chelynnah Whippet Servant Registered

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    Also the reflective covers you put on cars, if you put that over or around the crate reflective side in it will reflect her own heat back into the crate. Making a crate pad out of a memory foam mattress topper is a FAB idea both for joint support and warmth!
     
  16. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Cheers. That's all really good feedback for me to think about!

    I'm thinking a duvet for a childs bed might be the most versatile cos I could fold it triple for her to have a thick cushioning to lie on or if it's really cold lift up the top fold as she gets in and when she lies down throw it over her. Then if she get too warm she can climb out from under it at her discretion. The water bottle for back up or when she is sat in the van outside her cage. Just chuck it under her bed that is fitted down the side of the cage when it's pulled out.

    And yes we do do a lot for them but it doesn't compare to the sheer hilariousness that they create through their dumb antics.
     
  17. eingana

    eingana Do my ears look big in this? Registered

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    Molly's overnight bed in our room has a memory foam topper on it because it's so kind to ageing and sore joints and Mol already has arthritis in one leg. As long as you're thinking laterally about this then I'm sure you'll do the right thing for your little one- it's the people who think that all pet things must be those specifically made for them (usually at a huge price) and who as a result don't meet their animal's needs that bother me.
     
  18. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    what do you think about this?

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Memory-Foam-mattress-Toppers-at-All-Sizes-and-Thicknesses-/130861112800?pt=UK_Home_Garden_Duvets_Pillows_Toppers&var=&hash=item1e77ee1de0

    I'm guessing it's 6 ft long so it could be folded over probably 3 or 4 times and maybe use an off cut as a pillow and chuck a blanket in there during winter. Something I hadn't considered regarding memory foam is that it's anti fungal and antibacterial and also hypoallergenic.

    Think I may go with this!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2014
  19. Oreo

    Oreo New Member Registered

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    This is one thing I worry about.

    When my dog needs to come into the car with me I always make sure she has her seatbelt on.

    I'd love to get some kind of crate for her but my car is too small.

    Maybe making the boot a crate by putting up a guard in the back could help?
     
  20. forestboy1978

    forestboy1978 New Member Registered

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    Boots are not safe. I used to travel around with tools in the boot all the time and remember a colleague telling me about a top gear show where they tested putting things in the boot during collision. Apparently the back seats fail pretty easy and what's worse is that they line up the trajectory to the back of the driver and passangers heads. Not good for you, not good for your dog.

    I'm sure cars vary, but I would look into it if I were you. Good luck!
     

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