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Utter Madness

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by Rhythmpig, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Rhythmpig

    Rhythmpig Active Member Registered

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    Bedlington x Whippet = Lurcher = £150 - £200 a pup.
    Whidlington =Bedlington x Whippet Lurcher = £650 a pup.
    A Lurcherpoo = £600 a pup
    Utter madness,the dog world as gone mad,its truly mind boggling. Fruit loops everywhere.

    Sorry rant over
     
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  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Marketing... ;) Anyone who buys a 'whidlington' or a 'lurcherpoo' at those prices is being well and truly ripped off.

    Any offers for an Irish deergreylington? Failing that, I can sell you all the lurcherpoo you want for much less than £650 a bag:D
     
  3. Rhythmpig

    Rhythmpig Active Member Registered

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    @JudyN. ..sometimes I think I've been abducted by aliens and not been on this planet for twenty years,I really do.
     
  4. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    hahahahaha this made my morning!
     
  5. Josie

    Josie Administrator Administrator Registered

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    Would useful to know where you saw this @Rhythmpig :)
     
  6. Teddy560

    Teddy560 Well-Known Member Registered

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    Honestly, I just think the price of dogs in general is high at the moment. When we were looking for a cocker puppy, I saw red cockerpoos for sale £1000 and half the litter was already reserved. Mongrels in general are about £450+ in our area. A litter of staffy/poodle/boston terrier on my street all went for £400. I don't know why, but in our area of Scotland, dog prices seem to be particularly high. Cocker puppie are a good £200 cheaper where we used to live in England.
     
  7. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    And yet, I don’t think responsible breeders (few litters, well cared for dogs + conformation shows) get rich off their dog breeding business...

    Puppy mills probably do.
     
  8. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    All this designer nonsense drives me mad. Here any small cross lasa apso/ shih tzu/maltetese type was called a Boomer for years they were known as Boomer doggies and were mostly kept by older people who wanted a small fluffy dog.. Now they are getting 'designer' names and prices to match so a yorkizhu (yorkie- shih tzu) a maltatzu or a shihtese are now costing twice or three times what the old 'boomer 'used to but its the same dog!

    I think its this desire to own something unusual that drives the market so to have a dog no one has heard of gives you status and I have to say Id rather see the fools buying shihacockeryorkiepoos than the idiots who are importing dogs like Caucasian ovcharka, Tibetaanse mastiff, Boerboel and the Anatolian shepherd all of which can have serious socialiasation problems and are not suited to city life..
     
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Breeding healthy first-cross crossbreeds with good natured would cost even more than breeding good pedigrees as you can't use one of the offspring for the next generation, so I can understand the price. And some crosses do seem to make really good pets, with the positive aspects of both breeds, and potentially better health. (e.g. anything with a proper face crossed with a pug is likely to be healthier than a pug.) But when consumer choice is driven by fashion and/or a cute name (whippypoo?), that is just all wrong.

    On an old episode of The Yorkshire Vet last night a bulldog was having a caesarian as due to her breed there was no way she would be able to give birth normally. The puppies were whoppers and the vet confirmed that she would never have been able to produce them naturally. WHY ON EARTH ARE PEOPLE BREEDING FROM DOGS WHO CAN'T EVEN MANAGE THAT MOST BASIC OF FUNCTIONS, REPRODUCING?:mad:

    Sorry for the shouty caps:oops:
     
  10. WildeM

    WildeM New Member Registered

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    I bought Micky from a litter of staffies, I saw both parents in the home. It became apparent that he is definitely not a staffie, just look at his picture!

    20181206_145349-1.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2019
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  11. malwhit

    malwhit New Member Registered

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    Even a litter of five pups will give you £5000 in most breeds. I can't see how a profit can't be made in most cases.

    I wouldn't include the cost of buying the bitch or showing costs as you could have those expenses as part of your hobby.

    I found it funny when the new laws came in that the same breeders who said they made a loss or tiny profit from a litter were not happy about having to declare their income to HMRC

    As long as the dogs and puppies are cared for properly and and all the relevant health tests done, making a profit is not such a bad thing.
     
  12. merlina

    merlina Well-Known Member Registered

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    Having lost a lovely pedigree spaniel much too soon, we think because of inbreeding, I have mixed feelings now. To anyone buying a pedigree puppy of any breed I'd say research COI first and make sure it's as low as possible. (It means co-efficient of inbreeding.) I've found some breeders get very shifty when pressed on this point. To me having gone through absolute misery I think it's a more important number than the price tag when puppy-shopping. :( But I'd therefore agree with the view that a first cross can give a lovely healthy dog. To the owner of Micky I'd say he's beautiful! And will probably be healthier than a full staffie than could win Crufts!
     
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  13. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes, you can make a profit, but if this is your career, then you'd have to produce a few litters a year to make a living wage. Yet can we rely on 'hobby' breeders to do all the research necessary and put in the time to produce really great pups?

    I don't know the answers though. I don't know how we can best ensure that people can buy pups knowing that they will be healthy and happy and never end up in rescues or causing their owners heartache. You could also argue that if people can't afford to pay a high price for a good puppy, then maybe they can't afford a dog and all the expense that entains anyway.
     
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  14. Drift's Owner

    Drift's Owner Member Registered

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    Glad I got my 100% purebred mongrel from a charity - saved myself a bucket and got the best dog ever, (a possible biased opinion, but well verified by me). ;) The number of people I've met who say they thought they were buying a pure breed puppy, only to find out as it grew it was nothing like the breed they expected is growing. Even some perceived top breeders seem to be involved in scamming hundreds out of people.
     
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  15. Ragsysmum

    Ragsysmum Member Registered

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    However much some people pay, it will not make them good owners and many designer dogs are ending up in rescue too these days.
     
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  16. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    True - after all, if you're willing to pay a king's ransom for the latest fashion, then you're also more likely to want shot of it when it falls out of fashion or doesn't match your new decor.

    I know of one person who, when buying a pedigree dog whose relations did exceptionally well at Crufts, was totally misled about their dogs' temperament, so ended up with a very anxious reactive dog. The same breeder also seemed totally uninterested when one of the siblings dropped dead at a very young age, raising a question mark about the health of all the other dogs they bred.
     
  17. Nanny71

    Nanny71 Well-Known Member Registered

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    Dudley is a cross Bichon x chihuahua. Both were seen. He was £200. The owner told my granddaughter he didn't think his girlfriend's chihuahua would mount his Bichon. He also said it wouldn't happen again as the bitch was being spayed.
    Dudley was just advertised as a cross breed. The mother only had two.
    He is an ideal dog, lovely nature, and a lovely cuddly dog too.
    Two cockerpoo owners I see on the field intend to breed F2 cockerpoos to make money.
    Personally I think this is wrong there are too many supposedly designer breeds which, at the end of the day, are just crossbreeds being sold at a ridiculous price.
    When I was a child dogs were either pedigree or mongrels.
     
  18. Nanny71

    Nanny71 Well-Known Member Registered

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    He does look a lovely dog.
     
  19. Nanny71

    Nanny71 Well-Known Member Registered

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    Didn't pay a lot for him but he is priceless to me. Whatever he costs me he is worth it
     
  20. Nanny71

    Nanny71 Well-Known Member Registered

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    Nothing to do with dogs but my farmer brother in law says the same thing about bulls that are used on cows to make large beef cattle that the cow can't birth naturally
     

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