The Most Dog Friendly Community Online
Join and Discover the Best Things to do with your Dog

Welcome to Our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

When Can A Puppy Leave Its Mother?

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Violet Turner, Feb 22, 2018.

  1. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,810
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Trophy Points:
    113
    When Can A Puppy Leave Its Mother?

    I have been reading up on this topic a lot and i would like advice. A fair few people will give puppies away at 8 weeks but I'm not sure.

    I have been told 7 weeks, 8 weeks and 10 weeks but what am I to choose for my 4?

    I would love the puppies to stay longer but 10 weeks will be too much, and 7 weeks far too early. What age did you get your puppy at and why?

    In my experience I have suggested to other dog owners 8 weeks but is this too early?
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,979
    Likes Received:
    2,889
    Trophy Points:
    113
    To an extent it depends on the skills of the breeder & new owner. A breeder/trainer I know said she'd rather take a dog at 7 weeks if the breeder wasn't going to socialise it well, because she could then do the socialisation needed. It may also depend on the mother - I know Jasper's mum had more or less had enough of her litter by the time they were 5 weeks old so he wasn't in effect 'with his mum' by 7 weeks.

    Beyond this, there does seem to be conflicting advice on the internet. Any time between 8 and 12 weeks may be fine, but the later it is, the more vital socialisation by the breeder is. I think the breeder I mentioned makes sure that by the time the pups go they have spent time on their own in crates, and at someone else's house, so moving on won't be such a big change for them.
     
    Violet Turner and Kayak like this.
  3. Kayak

    Kayak Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    204
    Trophy Points:
    43
    The majority of standard pet breeders will start rehomong their puppies as soon as they can at 8 weeks, while some will hold onto the puppy until 12 weeks to provide the training and socialisation as well as to complete the initial course of vaccinations.

    I always thought it was illegal to separate puppies from the litter/dam before they are 8 weeks old.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  4. poptart

    poptart Member Registered

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    47
    Trophy Points:
    18
    We got Theo at 6 weeks. Can't remember the exact reason the breeder gave, but it was some sort of health problem with the mother. We managed fine although he was so tiny we had to bubble wrap a lot of the house for a couple of weeks to keep him safe. The biggest issue has been he has never seen himself as a dog. He doesn't play with other dogs or show much interest in them. I'm convinced that's because he left his litter too early.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  5. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    665
    Likes Received:
    1,160
    Trophy Points:
    93
    We got Harri at almost 10 weeks. He was ready whilst we were due to be on holiday and he stayed the extra time with the breeder (any decent breeder should be prepared to keep the pup for you like this) rather than us taking him with us and him having to get used to two new home environments - the holiday cottage and then his real home.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  6. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,810
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Trophy Points:
    113
    i am prepared for keeping them longer, i have not done home checks, should i do home checks and a background check on the owners?
     
  7. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    665
    Likes Received:
    1,160
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Some do - some don't! I think I would as I would want my pups to go to the right homes. Too many people are swept away by the idea of a cute puppy with no understanding of what they are actually letting themselves in for.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  8. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,810
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Trophy Points:
    113
    ok thank you! i will do some home checks :)
     
    Caro Perry likes this.
  9. maxfox

    maxfox New Member Registered

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    It would better to do after two month of living with mother. I`ve read some academic papers about it before I`ve got my puppy. It`s really nessecery to know before you give away your dogs. So, look. 1) Breast-feeding stops normally at 4-5th week but our vet recomended us to repeat this period till 8th week cutting it down gradually. It gives a time for animal to adapt himself to normal eating. 2) Socialisation! This is depends not only on mother but on her owners too. Puppy has to get used to people and it goes better when mum is near. It`s not as simple as seems to be.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  10. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,810
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Everyone has been round since day 1 so they have been socialised at home and we have done some home visits with Samson and Fudge, but not Ollie yet. They have had a couple of dogs come over and the puppies loved it! We have reduced breast feeding down to once a day every morning until next week were there will be none! :)
     
    Josie likes this.
  11. PWDmum

    PWDmum Active Member Registered

    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    119
    Trophy Points:
    43
    A bit late to this thread, but generally most puppies will leave their litter around 8 weeks of age, toy / small breeds will stay a little longer ( around 10weeks ) m due to a slower growth rate. But then it is also down to individuals litters and how quickly they develop , most dams have had enough of their babies around 5 weeks of age, they can become to much for the dam to cope with so she will spend less and less time in the whelping box with them. But that’s not the end of the socialisation those last few weeks with their litter mates it crucial to their education, just because mum is no longer interested, spending time with their siblings is important in learning social skills such as bite inhabitation.....along with social life lessons.
     
    leashedForLife likes this.
  12. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    698
    Trophy Points:
    113
    .

    In puppies, the primary socialization period ends at 12-WO / 3-MO, which gives the puppy-buyer only a month in which to do all their most-effective & easiest, critical socialization & habituation.
    The secondary socialization period runs from 12-WO / 3-MO to 6-MO, but it literally takes double the effort for half the quality of results; U have to bust yer butt to accomplish what would be as simple & easy as breathing, if it was done with that same pup when s/he was under 12-WO. [Any socialization or habituation that is done after 6-MO is considered rehabilitative - the dog missed the boat. :( ]

    Given those 2 facts, i wouldn't delay placing pups beyond 8 to 9-WO -- unless there was a very-unusual reason for an individual pup to need more time - such as recovering from a surgery [significant abdominal hernia, tying-off a PDA, or other major event].

    With only 4 weeks in which to introduce the puppy to a minimum of 100 widely-divergent friendly strangers, who each act, sound, look, & smell as differently as possible from one another, time is tight. // That's not even considering the additional need to expose the pup HAPPILY to many settings, noises, sights, etc, during that same time-period, for habituation.
    New-puppy owners have a tremendous amount to do, & very little time in which to do it - & do it well.

    - terry

    .
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.