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Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Stamford, Jan 9, 2022.

  1. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    I posted a while ago about our 13 yr old cocker bitch. The fact that as soon as the dark comes she just starts wandering. Wanting to go out on the garden 100 time an evening. We feed her. We make sure she's had a walk. We go to bed around midnight and go fast asleep to be woken three or four times through the night by her barking at the back door to go out. We are seriously at the end with this. It's affecting our health our sleep and our relationship as a family. We love her to bits. She's no trouble in the daylight. But at night I could gladly run away. The vet has been no help. Gave me acp which when we've used it just hypes her up even more. She's not hungry. She doesn't need a poo or wee as we see her go. I'm going back to vet tomorrow to see if there's anything more we can do. I can't go on much longer feeling so exhausted. I'm 60 years old. I don't want to go back to new baby status at my age. I just can't do it. Can anyone offer any advice please ? Also. She isn't poorly in any way either. So not pain related.
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I imagine this was mentioned before (I haven't read back your old posts) but it sounds like canine cognitive dysfunction, a dog dementia.

    Some people find a supplement called Aktivait helps. You could try a SAD lamp which mimics daylight, and melatonin supplements; both of these seem to help people with dementia. But please check with your vet before using more than one supplement at a time. Also have music playing softly so it isn't completely silent.

    What about having her in your room so you can reassure her? Do you have a partner, can you alternate nights on duty / off duty?
     
  3. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Have you followed up all the suggestions in your previous thread? Please please help

    My dog has been on Vitofyllin for several weeks now and I think it helps - most nights recently he has slept through, though last night he was showing similar behaviour until midnight. He always seems to settle by around then, but even that's wearing enough, so I really do sympathise with you (I'm also 60). I would try your vet again, mention Vitofyllin, and ask for other suggestions. (Note that Vitofyllin should be taken on an empty stomach - I'd been sticking it in his meals for a couple of weeks before I got round to reading the leaflet :oops:

    I'm also sleeping downstairs now so it's easier to deal with, and means only one of us gets disturbed. Would it help if you made up a bed for you right next to where she sleeps (unless she already sleeps next to your bed of course)? I think my dog would be more settled if I did that rather than being in the next room, but for logistical reasons it's not possible. I would also aim to have a rota for 'overnight dog duty' - knowing you can get a decent night's kip one night in two can really help you cope.

    Also, does she get worked up when in the garden? If I let mine out into the garden at night he can be down the end barking and working himself up into a state for an hour... I let him out instead into a small enclosed area so he can toilet if need be and look down the garden. It does help, and just sometimes he'll decide if I'm only letting him out into that bit he might as well not bother and take himself back to bed.

    Ultimately, from my own research, though, there is no fix that will work indefinitely - it's pretty much the same as with humans with dementia. So there is an element of just having to cope with it as best you can, until you can't...
     
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  4. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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  5. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    She sleeps in our room. She also has a double bed in the spare room she sleeps on too. But it's like she becomes obsessed. She just frets and wanders. But she doesn't do it all day when it's light. She has company as my husband stays up watching tv quite
    Late. So there is some background noise. We do alternate nights. I even went to spare bed last night to get some sleep but she scratches on door then jumps on and off the bed. Honestly I hate to complain about her because she's been our joy for years, but I'm not sure how much longer we can deal with this. We're all working and exhausted in the daytime because we've been up every night for most of the night.
     
  6. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    It's called sundowners syndrome in humans, and is very common:(

    We had to stop Jasper going upstairs because of joint issues, and that actually helped in a way - I don't have to go traipsing up and downstairs to try to reassure him or let him out, and he can't scratch on the bedroom door and wake hubby.

    Don't feel guilty about complaining - broken sleep can be a killer, and even when she does settle you can't sleep because you know you're likely to be woken again. I would try all the things suggested in this thread and your previous one (though as JoanneF says, not all at the same time), and brainstorm coping strategies, whether it's stopping her disturbing the 'off duty' person, or even taking it in turns to sleep at a friend's house! Oh, and if you do find a strategy that helps, please let us know because I expect my dog will deteriorate over time too...
     
  7. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    I've tried all sorts. I have definetely noticed that she becomes worse when it gets dark. We're all sat relaxing. She's up and down at the moment. Panting. She just won't settle. Yet all day we've had to keep her active. She's been too chilled if anything in the daylight. I just don't get it. We dread bedtime.
     
  8. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    I've made an appointment with the vet. I'm going to ask for a referral to a cognitive dysfunctional clinic at the vet hospital. See if they can help in any way.
     
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Good luck - and do please let us know how you get on.
     
  10. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    Took her to vet. He's now given her some sileo gel. Supposed to be good to calm dogs on firework night. Well....
    I gave her a small dose, it made her quiet and sleepy for about two hours. Then she was up again. So twice again at 3.45am and 5.15am. For half hour each time. I've been woken up this morning with someone hammering in my front door. It's 10.20am !! I'm embarrassed. But I've been up half the night. It's also triggered my tinnitus into vertigo and I'm supposed to be going out today. That won't happen now. Another day ruined. Whilst she's upstairs flat out asleep in the floor. I'm really out of rope. The vet said all we can do is try different things.
     
  11. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    No referral to cognitive dementia clinic. I cannot afford to pay and my insurance won't cover it.
     
  12. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Bear in mind that some treatments will take a while - e.g. weeks - to have an effect. And the fact that Sileo can be administered every 2 hours (up to 5 doses) suggests that effects wear off pretty quickly, so it might not be appropriate for your situation. This is only what I've concluded from 5 minutes googling, though - although Sileo seems to be marketed just for sound aversion, your vet might have had success using it for dogs with dementia.
     
  13. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    Well they are administering another one later today. I don't know the name. It's a syrup. And it's longer lasting apparently. Sileo was £30 for three doses. That's one night. So no way I can afford to keep her on that. I'll keep you posted. Thank you for replying. I feel all on my own with this.
     
  14. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    Have you checked if it works out cheaper buying it on line rather than from vets? One 3 ml syringe seem to be £17-£20..
     
  15. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I wondered that, but there would also be the prescription charge on top - the saving would depend on how many doses the vet would put ono one prescription.

    Stamford, you're not alone, there's a lot of people going through similar. I do wonder, though, if your vet is only offering you treatment that costs a tenner a dose and only lasts a few hours, whether it's worth seeking a second opinion. Or at least asking your vet about some of the other remedies that have been suggested here and in your other thread.
     
  16. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    Yes that's what it works out as. I can't afford that and to be honest it only last around three hours which means she will still wake up in the night. I'm trying her on a Cheaper med tonight. It's called trazadone. It's a syrup. I pray this one lasts longer. I need just one full nights sleep.
     
  17. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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  18. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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  19. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Hemlock likes this.
  20. Stamford

    Stamford Member Registered

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    Hello just an update. The vet gave our dog a mild sedative in a liquid syrup form. We have been giving her half a dose every night and we have had some whole nights sleep which has been fantastic. There are no long-term effects from this drug as we only give her half the dose. So I think we may have found a solution thank goodness.
     

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