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Biting dog

Discussion in 'Dog Pictures and Videos' started by Danielle, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. Danielle

    Danielle New Member Registered

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    We have a 2 year old Staffordshire bull terrier. He is very loving and affectionate but he is also very protective. We’ve had him since he was a puppy and he’s always hated people coming into the garden. He used to hate it when even we did but now he lets us come in. On Sunday we had a visitor at the house and the dog got into the garden (which we normally wouldn’t allow but we had no idea he was out there, the visitor) he jumped on him and got a little aggressive and when my dad tried to pull him off the visitor (who was unharmed) the dog bit my dad and my dad now has soft tissue damage. It’s not normal for him to act this way unless somebody is in the garden. We don’t know what to do about him. Like I said we keep him in the house when people are in the garden but we don’t want to risk him biting a stranger and having to get him put down. Someone please help we don’t want to have to get rid of him, he is part of the family but we now know he is capable of hurting someone
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Management, management, management... Make sure your dog has a 'safe place' to go to when visitors are around (e.g. a crate or a room) and ensure he can't get out when people are in the garden (you may need to work on him being happy being left in this space).

    What is he like if you are in the garden with a visitor and then he's let into the garden? If he's OK then, you might be able to work on teaching him that visitors in the garden is a good thing by you (not the visitor) giving him treats in that situation. Also work on a really good recall from the garden into the house, though it might not work if he gets worked up and feels the need to 'protect' the garden.
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    This has the potential to be serious, your dog doesn't actually have to bite someone to fall foul of the dangerous dogs act; they just need to be fearful that he might. And you could have unexpected visitors at any time. There are three things I suggest.

    First, in order to get to the root of why this behaviour is happening (dislike of strangers? fear? resource guarding the garden? or the family?) and working towards a solution, I think you need help from a reputable behaviourist. Please try to get someone who uses up to date methods, preferably accredited by COAPE or the APBC. Avoid anyone who talks about dominance and pack leadership; this is outdated and if your dog is aggressive because of anxiety (which is possible) it will make him worse. Your vet should be able to refer you and your insurance may cover it.

    Second, muzzle train your dog. Do it gently, make the muzzle a good thing. Use squeezy cheese or meat paste and let him lick it, work up to putting it on. There are videos on YouTube, look for Kikopup - I think she has one.

    Third, management. Double door your dog from the garden, never have him out there alone, have him on a lead or long line so you can keep control.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
  4. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    Could it also be possible to put some sort of gate/latch/lock/lever to prevent people just walking into your garden? This would give you time to manage your dog before he's able to "greet" your visitor.
     

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