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Breed advice please

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by Rachelleigh, May 4, 2019.

  1. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Hi - we would like to find a dog that would be suitable to live in a house with a lively 4 year old child. A Cockerpoo or a Springador have been recommended by our vet as being robust and good natured, and he recommends getting a puppy that would grow up with the little girl. I have looked at descriptions of these two breeds and they both seem have a tendency to be large sized dogs that need a lot of exercise. I'm wondering if there are any other breeds that might also be a good fit. Ideally we'd prefer a smaller sized dog with a more moderate need for exercise. I wondered if anyone on the forum could suggest a breed that might be a good choice. With thanks!

    Rachel
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    How much time can you spend walking/training/playing with the dog each day?

    There's a few dog breed selectors online which an internet search will bring up. I tried putting in some of your requirements and it came up with, amongst others, Japanese chin, poodle and bichon frise. But then it also came up with deerhound, so do research any breed suggested!!
     
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  3. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    The two you've mentioned are not actually breeds but cross breeds, so if you dont mind that maybe an adult rescue would be a good way to go ..Often they are past the peeing, biting, yapping, stage and have learned some manners.

    Be careful though small does not always mean less energy think JRT v Greyhound.. Whereas a greyhound might lounge for 90% of the day a JRT is a bundle of energy that will look for mischief if not kept busy.

    Similarly a beagle is small very friendly and great with kids but they are an absolute nightmare for running off , escaping and eating anything they can get at which is not great with kids who tend to leave food within reach and doors /gates open..They also get very fat if not given loads of exercise ..

    I wish you luck but dont just go down the fashionable poo/ador route try thinking outside the box a bit.
     
  4. Stark1951

    Stark1951 New Member Registered

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    I know a lot of cockerpoo dogs and they seem to be excellent with children. As to size, I wouldn't say they're big - it depends on the type of poodle they are crossed with. If it's a toy or miniature poodle, they should be small. They are very, very energetic when young though, but also very trainable.
     
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  5. merlina

    merlina Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think with any spaniel x (whatever the size) you are looking at high-octane. I've had four: fun but not what you'd call restful! And like all working dogs they can get frustrated/destructive without an active life. Why not look for a poodle x'd with a more laid-back breed? A bichon frise, say? I only mention it 'cos there was a sweet one waiting outside the shop this morning. Her elderly owner said she was 'perfect.' :D
     
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  6. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I wonder what cavapoos are like? I just mention them because cavaliers are meant to have wonderful, easy temperaments (on the whole) but huge problems with genetic health disorders that lead many to say that you shouldn't touch one with a bargepole.

    When looking at 'designer crosses' though, you need to be VERY careful to research the breeder - health testing on both parents for starters - at a guess there's probably more puppy-farm 'designer crosses' than carefully bred ones.
     
  7. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    French bulldog?
     
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  8. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    Great idea...
     
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  9. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Member Registered

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    Cockerpoos are very popular with young families where we live. I have to say, most of the ones I have met have been lovely dogs and not been that big – about the height of a beagle. However, they do seem quite active and enjoyed a good bark. As others have already said, my main concern with buying a popular cross such as a cockerpoo would be trying to find a reputable breeder.

    I think that Cavalier King Charles Spaniels make lovely, small family dogs. I know that there are several serious health problems associated with the breed which would put some people off owning them (although the same could be said for quite a few pedigree dogs, including the breed I own). Personally, it is a breed I would still consider owning as long as I could find the right breeder. There is also the King Charles Spaniel, which I have read does not suffer from the same health issues as the CKCS.
     
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  10. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

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    I had a King Charles - they are really hard to get nowadays, I think only around 100 puppies a year are born. He was my first childhood dog and a proper little horror. He was OK with the family but we had to warn everyone else not to touch him!

    He was re-homed with my grandparents when we moved abroad and on our return my parents bought another Welsh Terrier as in the interim my grandfather's dog had died and he'd have been heartbroken to lose the KC too.

    Welshies are actually lovely family dogs - very good with children. They don't need mega amounts of exercise but they do need to be kept busy or they get into mischief and are always up for a game of something. I haven't yet found the "off switch" so are quite demanding. They are also strong minded and independent which are all traits I love in them but maybe not everyone's cup of tea.
     
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  11. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Member Registered

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    According to the breed standard they should have a ‘gentle and affectionate nature’, the ones I met at Discover Dogs certainly did. I guess you were unlucky, but every breed has its rogue members.
     
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  12. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thanks JudyN - probably up to an hour of walking with extra time for training/play etc. I've just tried an online quiz which gave some different suggestions - thanks for the idea!
     
  13. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thanks for contributing. We're definitely not looking for fashionable but for a dog that is a good fit - and these were the two that our vet suggested. I am torn between a puppy that will grow up knowing my niece and a more 'known' adult dog that may be more resilient. But I'm taking lots of advice. Thanks again!
     
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  14. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thank you - there does seem to be some variation in size. Thanks for the feedback!
     
  15. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thank you - I appreciate the suggestion - the Bishon Frise has been suggested by others too ...
     
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  16. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thank you for the interesting breed suggestion and the advice re: breeder research - much appreciated!
     
  17. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Brilliant - thank you for this - I really appreciate the advice here
     
  18. Rachelleigh

    Rachelleigh New Member Registered

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    Thank you for sharing. I have some experience of terriers - and whilst I love them I think I'm wary of bringing one into this household - but will take a closer look. Thanks again!
     
  19. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    There are some terriers that are less "terrer-ish" that others. Westies come to mind as a more biddable type and might be worth a look although they can suffer from skin complaints so again it's important to choose your breeder carefully. Has anyone suggested a miniature poodle?
     
  20. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    Bishon Frise crosses are very popular here they are known as boomer dogs and they are a great family favourite.
    Often crossed with small poodles or shih tzu's they are good with children and fairly low exercise but do require grooming on a regular basis..
     

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