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Cavapoo or Yorkie?

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by Kat333, May 5, 2018.

  1. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    We have been thinking about getting a dog for a long time and have now narrowed it down to a choice between a Cavapoo or a Yorkie but find both types of dog really lovely.
    The male side of our family would like the Cavapoo because the ones we have met have such friendly natures and look just like teddybears.
    The female side of the family would like a Yorkie as it is smaller in size, easier to handle (I'm thinking washing after muddy walks, etc.) and take away on a family holiday, etc.

    Which would you pick and why? :)
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
  2. Teddy560

    Teddy560 Active Member Registered

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    I vote cavapoo
     
  3. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Have you got any experience with Cavapoos Teddy560? If so I'd love to hear. Thanks.
     
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    When it comes to ease of handling, temperament is probably more important than size. Plus small dogs come with a range of drawbacks such as having to bend down every time you want to give them a treat - it makes walking nicely on lead a bit harder!

    I don't know anything about cavapoos but some - not all - Yorkies can be nervous, and then when they're nervous their terrier spirit can come out. It's such a shame small dogs can get a reputation for being yappy and snappy as generally it can be avoided with careful socialisation. But the cavapoo might have a more robust nature if you have young children.

    What I would do would be to look for breeders of each type, then go and meet the breeders, talk about their dogs, ask about the parents and ask if you can meet them, how many litters they produce a year, health checks, what socialisation they do before they let the dogs go to their new homes. Ask what is good and bad about their breed/type. Do they raise the pups in the home, and do they make a start on housetraining? Ask what they feed their dogs, and then check the quality of the food online. I'd also be on the lookout for them questioning you to find out if you're a good potential dog owner - this is a good sign. You want a breeder who will turn you down if they're not convinced you'd be a great owner. A good breeder will be happy for you to contact them after you've bought the pup if you have any problems and if it really doesn't work out, will take the pup back.

    What I'm really saying is that getting a carefully bred and raised puppy may well be more important than which breed you get.
     
  5. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    The risk with a cavapoo is finding a reputable breeder. Cavaliers can have a horrible genetic condition called syringomyelia; and also inherited problems with knees (luxating patella). Poodles are also at risk from the luxating patella. So a cross could inherit that particular condition from both sides, or the syringomyelia from the cav and also lp from the poodle. Because these are problems the dogs inherit from the parents, good breeders will screen and test their dogs before breeding. Sadly, many breeders don't. Historically breeders of pure pedigree rather than cross bred dogs have been more vigilant in screening. There are some good breeders of crosses who carry out the relevant tests but they are rare. Equally there are puppy farms that churn out badly bred pedigrees condemned to a life of suffering and owners who spend too much time and money at the vet. Whichever you choose, please make sure the parents have had the appropriate tests (not checks - those just say the dog has the physical ability to mate) or the amount you save on the purchase will be massively swamped by the amount you pay in vet bills.
     
  6. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Thank you both - good advice.
    I hadn't thought about the bending down thing with small dogs.
    I have found a few breeders of Cavapoos that seem to be very good on health testing (not sure if you are allowed to name any names sin here) but I didn't want to get in touch unless I was sure about the breed we wanted. But maybe I just should. Thanks.
     
  7. PWDmum

    PWDmum Active Member Registered

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    Are you making your desicion based on what you like the look of, because you have narrowed it down to two totally different temperaments, the yorkie. May look cute but it is a terrier at the end of the day, so if you have researched terrier temperaments and are happy with what’s involved then a yorkie will suit you, if not then the cavapoo , but as has already been said finding a reputable breeder who health tests their dogs is rare . The cavalier and the poodle are both nice happy family friendly breeds, maybe widen your search to either or, and make sure what ever you buy. You buy from a breeder who health tests for genetic issues in said breed.
     
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  8. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    The reason we are thinking about those two in particular is that they are supposed to be better than most for allergy sufferers. My husband has a slight allergic reaction to dogs so ideally we would one that would produce as little a reaction as possible. I know there are no guarantees as there are no truly hypo allergenic dogs, but this is the reason we have picked these two and because we like the looks and temperament of both.
    Personally I would prefer a smaller dog for practical reasons and also Im thinking that the big fluffy fur of a Cavapoo might carry many more allergens with it than the smooth yorkie coat would. And I guess with regards to allergies it would always also be a question of the smaller the dog, the smaller the risk of any reaction.

    I would love to hear from any Cavapoo and Yorkie owners about their dogs. Thanks!
     
  9. merlina

    merlina Well-Known Member Registered

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    Don't want to complicate things but apart from some grim inherited health issues to look into, spaniel hair is very fine and can cause allergies as I've found. I'm mildly allergic to our latest cocker though have never been to any dog before. I think it's luck re the coat. Maybe the Yorkie will at least shed less.
     
  10. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Thanks Merlina, I didnt realise that about the spaniel hair...
     
  11. merlina

    merlina Well-Known Member Registered

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    Just to clarify it's the silky coat that does it. I'm not affected by a friend's very woolly/curly cockerpoo that looks like a small sheep!
     
  12. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Interesting. Just shows you how different people react to different things with dogs, doesn't it. I guess its just not really possible to tell beforehand..
     
  13. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Some people are allergic to the saliva of a dog rather than hair or dander - sorry if that info was unhelpful! But why not try contacting a few breeders, be honest about not having made a final decision and ask if they have any dogs you could meet to help you make a choice?
     
  14. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    If you visit a breeder, your husband might even be able to give the parents, or a similarly bred dog, a good sniff and fondle and see if he reacted.

    A good breeder is like any other owner - they'll happily talk about their dogs and their characteristics for ages so I'm sure a good one would be really happy to help you make the right decision.

    I did have a Yorkie when I was a child, and she was a lovely natured dog - but that was in the 70s and breed characteristics could have changed a lot since then.
     
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  15. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Thanks, yes, prob a good idea to talk to some breeders :)
     
  16. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    I agree with the above advice re where you adopt from. I've had 2 yorkies in my time,(at different times) but both adopted when they were around 12years old, one the owner had sadly passed away and the other was going to be pts because she had become incontinent..( though with hormone tabs, she hadn't been spayed, and regular toileting she did really well). In my opinion they are amazing, spirited little dogs, even coping with a change at their stage of life, they lived every day twice, absolutely loved them! :)
     
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  17. Kat333

    Kat333 New Member Registered

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    Aw that sounds lovely Flobo, so good of you to rehome and give the wee yorkies a good life! Thanks for your input!
     
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  18. Nanny71

    Nanny71 Well-Known Member Registered

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    Dudley is a small dog. Easy to cuddle. Also he does not moult as he has a Bichon type coat. The thing with non moulting dogs is they need to be clipped fairly frequently as opposed to a dog with a coat that sheds.
     
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  19. Sezzy

    Sezzy Well-Known Member Registered

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    I agree with that. Misty doesn’t moult being a poodle cross. I cut her hair every six weeks, and still have to trim around her eyes in between cuts.
    I have suffered with animal allergies since a child, but have had no problems with Misty.
     
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