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Dog training for fetch

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by casper26, Apr 19, 2021.

  1. casper26

    casper26 New Member Registered

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    Dear fellow members,
    Hope you are doing well and enjoy sunshine today

    My dog: 2 years Jack Russell, female, un-sprayed
    Me: first time dog owner, have her for about 5 months.

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    She has no interest in any toy and doesn't chew any toy. I bought her many toys, she is only interested in simple toy wit treat. She will gives on if it is too difficult to get the treat.

    Toys she is ok
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    Toys she will simply give up[​IMG] [​IMG]
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    Let's make the long story short,

    I would like to teach my dog play fetch, I google and tried all method on toutube. But my angel simply has no interest on any toy, she doesn't crew and bite any toy, therefore she doesn't chase any toy. I google and check professional dog training, but none has dog training to play fetch (probably too simple because many dog learns immediately??)

    Any advice to teach my angel to play fetch?

    Thanks.
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Is there any reason you want her to learn fetch? I would just accept that it doesn't interest her, for whatever reason. A lot of dogs simply aren't that interested in toys. If she will 'perform' for treats, I'd accept that, and do the sort of training/play she enjoys and finds rewarding, and that works her brain.

    If you did want to persist, I would work on training her to pick up a toy or object close to you (I use the cue 'take it'), and then to deliver it into your hand from point blank range ('drop'). Then once she's got the idea, I'd put the object a few feet from you and encourage her to 'take it' and then deliver it to your hand. Eventually, you might be able to throw a ball and get her to retrieve it. But if not, just regard it as one of those fun training activities where you accept however far you get - the benefit is in the interaction, not in the final result, if that makes sense.
     
  3. casper26

    casper26 New Member Registered

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    I wish she learn to play and enjoy her own time. I bought a lot toys for her, hoping she will play and enjoy. Fetch is one key activity I hope she will pick up because it encourages she to run at my minimum effort (I can throw the ball occasionally during I am working). Currently she is entirely depend on me. She will be sleeping all day and looking forward for the only 1.5 hour walk everyday.

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  4. Rinkydinkydo

    Rinkydinkydo Well-Known Member Registered

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    Some people's would say you were lucky having a JRT that didn't want to play. I know of some that would drive a lot of people nuts trying to keep up with them wanting to play fetch.
     
    Finsky likes this.
  5. casper26

    casper26 New Member Registered

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    My dog is my angel, though she has her super naughty side too. She would turn into super impatient devil when we are going out for the walk, she will cry, bark, dance haka to wish I can put up her harness and change my shoe in 0.00000000001 ms. :(
     
  6. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    We don't all like the same things, and nor do they.

    I bet she'd love to play scenting games in the house and garden, and as she likes her walks so much, how about giving her two a day? One could be quite a short walk letting her scent where wild animals have been, and the other could be the long exercising walk she already has.
     
  7. JacksDad

    JacksDad Active Member Registered

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    Definitely be careful what you wish for, you just might get it and the result might not be what you envisioned.

    food for thought. Taking a walk with sniff breaks is a whole different kind of excessive than just running and chasing a ball. Both can have their place and both can meet a need, but by them self might not meet all your dog's needs.

    Walks are steady pace, longer duration, and if including sniff breaks works the dog mind. This can lead to a exercised dog that is not on an adrenaline high, but rather and nice healthy calm.

    playing fetch is a repetitive, high adrenaline activity for some dogs. in healthy amounts can be a good thing. but your dog doesn't learn to be calm in other active contexts.

    jack, over the course of his life did become a bit more playful with his toys. however, his great loves were walks, exploring and seeking out hidden bits of treats around the house. he was a terrier mix, possibly JR. I remember the initial disappointment when I realized he was not interested in the things I thought he would be. But as I learned what he was interested in, it was very enjoyable to see his joy at doing what he loved.

    be open to what your dog guides you to as their preferred activities.
     
    Biker John likes this.
  8. Finsky

    Finsky Well-Known Member Registered

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    As a terrier....'fetching' can go against its natural instincts. I've had a terrier in past that were not interested of any toys at all and couple that didn't 'play' UNLESS it involved actions that imitated what they were to do with prey and often they would not do it on they own but it had to be done with company. So ragging with rope (me holding the other end of it)...chasing and breaking empty lemonade bottles...tennis balls, but only for destruction of them, not for fetching :rolleyes: But it took time to find out the 'games' that tricked their interests. I would suggest to carry on finding what your dog is interested of...don't forget, something might not interest your little one at this point of life, but it doesn't mean that it doesn't discover being so in future....so keep trying and repeat them in future. That on it own it kind of 'game' to play ;)
    BTW...I've got 4 terriers now and I'm still involved with playing with them...they won't 'play' on their own or even with just their sisters..it just has to involve one of us humans to be 'proper' playing.
     

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