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My clothes stink!! Any tips?

Discussion in 'Dog Grooming' started by Jack-Russell-Lover, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    Okay so, I'm a dog groomer and I work 3 or 4 days a week right now.
    My clothes absolutely reek of dog! Now normally dog smell does not bother me in the slightest but this is like something I've never smelt before..it's dog smell X 1000! Even after washing my work clothes really stink. I even use Lenor Unstoppables and that doesn't help! I wash my clothes after each work week so it's not like they're hanging around to stink more, I wash them as soon as I get home on my last work day of the week. I just don't know what to do to get on top of the smell. It may not matter that much as they are only work clothes, I don't wear them elsewhere but it just puts me off wearing them at the start of the week when they should be clean but I don't feel like they are! I'm even having to handwash them right now because putting them through the washing machine has made that stink!!! HELP!!
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Try half a cup of white vinegar in the wash cycle - that helps with odours.
     
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  3. Caro Perry

    Caro Perry Well-Known Member Registered

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    Line drying outside whenever possible also helps
     
  4. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    I hate any fabric softener perfume stuff ,it makes me itch but white vineger is great leave clothes soft and fresh everytime.
     
  5. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Has this only started recently? Do your other clothes smell fine after being washed? Has anyone else commented on the smell? Could you ask them how the clothes smell to them just to make sure you've not become oversensitive to it?
     
  6. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    What fiber are the work-clothes made of?

    Polyester & other synthetics are often *terrible* for absorbing odors of all kinds, nice or nasty; the 1st "drip-dry" shirts that were sold were often worn by salesmen who traveled constantly, & they'd hand-wash a shirt in their hotel room sink, knowing it would dry by morning on a hanger, almost totally wrinkle-free... but as soon as U put it on, it smelled of yesterday's sweat. Just the warmth of yer body brought the smell out of the freshly-washed shirt.

    Natural fibers that don't hold odors forever:
    - cotton
    - linen
    - hemp
    - rayon
    ... are washable & sturdy; COTTON doesn't breathe well, & if the salon has no AC, U'll sweat uncomfortably.
    LINEN breathes well, but light linens won't handle friction well. HEMP breathes well, & is incredibly durable.
    RAYON comes in different weights; it breathes well, but it's often labeled "dry-clean only". Don't take this as irrefutable; most rayons hand-wash beautifully & hang-dry nicely, & if Ur washer has a hand-wash or delicate setting, i'd just machine-wash it on 'delicate'. :)
    My own rayon clothing, after an initial hand-washing to check for running dye, goes into the washer with like colors on 'normal', & i also toss it in the dryer... so long as it's not running dye, which i test with a 2nd hand-wash, just in case.

    - wool
    - silk
    both breathe well; WOOL will pick up penetrating odors, such as cig-smoke, but will release them when it's washed -
    light-woven wools can be surprisingly cool in hot environs. SILK's downfall is friction, as the threads are chewed quickly by repeated rubbing [cuff edges, hem edges, etc].

    In similar circs, with heat, wet, fast-moving work, etc, I've combined short-sleeved silk shirts [Hawai'ian shirts are perfect, IMO - loose cut, U can move, they cover everything, no cleavage-peeping, etc] & linen slacks, or light hemp, if I could find them - as hemp is so tough. Rayon in a mid-weight weave is also good, but wash it well B4 wearing, or U may have dye on yer skin.
    I can especially recommend Tommy Bahama heavy-silk Hawai'ian shirts; incredibly well-made & durable, they dry almost wrinkle-free in a dryer - I wash them on Normal, dryer on medium heat, & they look great! I fold & roll them, & put the rolled shirts in my suitcase or dresser-drawer - I don't unbutton them, I button EVERY button B4 washing, & wash / dry them inside-out.
    Then I open the top button, fold & roll them, & when i wear them, unbutton just one more, to get it over my head - I've converted them to "pullovers", LOL. I button that one button, & I'm ready to go. :)

    side note:
    Always wash new clothing B4 wearing - including sox, undies, & lingerie.
    Makers leave sizing in the fabric, to add body, "hand", & drape, & they may also use dirt-repelling chemicals to keep clothes in retail outlets from becoming shop-worn. Sizing & coatings can cause wicked skin-reactions, from rashes to swelling, that need a Dr's attn & may require antihistamines, steroids, or both, & can take 3 days to a week or longer to resolve.

    HTH,
    - terry

    .
     
  7. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    this is another cellulosic / wood-derived fiber -

    Is Tencel (aka Lyocell) A Sustainable Fabric? The Textile Test Series Investigates - Eco-Chick

    Tencel is the closest imitation to true silk I've ever encountered, but no silkworms die to make it.
    It has an incredible "hand", drapes beautifully, & takes friction far-better than silk; it breathes well, & unlike many cellulose fibers [rayon, for instance], TENCEL is made using a closed-loop process - all the chemicals are captured, filtered, & re-used. No chemicals are discarded to pollute streams, soil, or air.

    Most Tencel is machine-washable -- if it says "dry-clean only", hand-wash it 1st, & for pity's sake, don't use Woolite! - horrible stuff, don't even use Woolite on wool.
    If it hand-washes nicely, I'd make sure it's not running dye, & wash it in a machine on 'delicate' with cool or cold water.

    7th Generation makes very safe, very effective cleaners that are environmentally responsible; I use & recommend their dishwashing products [hand & machine], & their laundry cleaners.
    I also use & recommend 'Method' cleaners, another line of environmentally-aware products, such as their dishwashing soap for manual, their all-purpose cleaner [stone, granite counters, glass, mirrors, any NON-antique wood furniture, etc].
    as usual, i don't get a dime or any other consideration - I use 'em, they work great, I like 'em. :)

    - terry

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  8. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thanks for the tips!
    I will try white vinegar, but would that still work in a handwash?
    At the moment in a hadnwash I put persil detergent, Lenor fabric softener and some disinfectant.
    Unfortunately I don't have the choice of what fabrics I wear as it's uniform, I think it's polyester and cotton blend I wear.
    And yeah, my partner notices the smell too, and other clothes smell fine.
     
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  9. FrankieDoodle

    FrankieDoodle Active Member Registered

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    Hello. I swear by white vinegar (just the cheap stuff) and bicarbonate of soda (natural deodoriser). Cheap as chips.

    This will also help clean and keep your washing machine fresh on a hot wash.
     
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  10. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I would soak it in a diluted solution of vinegar (5%?) for an hour then wash as normal. If that doesn't work try soaking for longer or increasing the vinegar.
     
  11. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    Petrol and matches? :D
     
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  12. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    maybe if other employees also have this problem, U might get together, & ask the shop-owner about switching to natural fibers in the uniforms?
    Perhaps if U each covered half the cost, & then were reimbursed in a month, the owner would be more willing to chuck the synthetic-blend & replace them all. :)

    .
     
  13. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thanks I will try soaking it in vinegar dilute before washing! Hahaha, I would love to just burn them @arealhuman
    @leashedForLife I am the only employee!
     
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  14. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    QUOTE, Jack-Russell-Lover:

    ...leashedForLife, I am the only employee!
    ___________________________________
    .

    oh, pshaw. :( I'm sorry - i thot there might be 2 or 3 groomers, & 3 or 4 brush'n'bathe folks.
    I hoped for strength in numbers, & some support from fellow employees, so the owner didn't get cross with U for "being picky" or summat. Darn.
    As an only, i guess that it's up to U - unless U want to raise the Q with the boss of non-synthetic uniforms [which probly won't go down a treat], I'd just try to eliminate as much whiff as possible by presoaking with cider-vinegar & then washing with a good free n' clear laundry liquid [no perfumes / fragrance / added artificial colors / etc].

    Have U been there for a year, yet? - maybe for the work-anniversary, U might ask about splitting the cost of a natural-fiber coverall? Just a thought. // If the salon logo is a sewn-on badge, U can easily transpose it to a new uniform of the same color/s.
    I hope something works, of the tips above! - when I was cooking in restaurants & fraternities, & serving in clubs, I used to hate the funky smells that got into my clothes & my hair; burger grease & overdone bacon, onions, fish, cig smoke, old beer... blecch.
    Whenever we had burgers for lunch, I'd wash my hair in the office bathroom before leaving for the day. Grease is gross. :(
    I feel for ya.

    - terry

    .
     
  15. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thanks Terry, so far I haven't tried the vinegar but have tried handwashing as normal and hanging outside to dry, as suggested by @Caro Perry which has really seemed to help! They smell a lot fresher this morning and didn't take an age to dry as they do inside!
    I might just try vinegar too to make them extra fresh :)
    I get what you mean about stinking clothes from food places! I used to work in a Bistro that did Thai style food and my clothes would reek reek of it! My partner hated it! I bet he'd prefer that now mind you after smelling my grooming clothes!!
     

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