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Need urgent help please

Discussion in 'Support and Feedback' started by Robyn Wilson, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. Robyn Wilson

    Robyn Wilson New Member Registered

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    Basically I’m 13 and my family own a dog called molly. She is a border terrier cross and is generally quite nice. She sleeps in my bed at night but if she is in the middle of it, I move her. Sometimes when I do this, she growls at me and sometimes even snaps at me. I find this quite scary because when I pull my hand away I have no idea if she would actually have done it. Today she terrified me when I tried to pick her up. She proper growled at me and snapped. It’s only me she does this to. She doesn’t do it to my mum (her owner) or my brother who never really bothers with her anyway. WHAT DO I DO? WHY DIES SHE HATE ME? Please help...
     
  2. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Some dogs really don't like being physically lifted or moved. It's nothing to do with Molly not liking you - she might even feel more secure about telling you how she feels when you move her.

    The way around it is quite simple. First, don't lift or carry her. Lots of people have dogs who are too heavy to lift anyway, so imagine she's a wolfhound or a mastiff. Second, train her to move to where you want her to go. This could be to a rug at the foot end of your bed, or it might be easier to train her to get off the bed when asked, then you can get in and invite her up. If she gets snappy if you want to roll over in the night, it could be easier to train her to sleep on her own bed next to yours.

    All training should be done as if you were teaching her to do a really clever trick - 'Yay, you got of the bed, CLEVER girl! Have a bit of sausage! And another bit!' If she's really reluctant to shift, do something like go to the kitchen, open and shut the fridge door, and call her in a happy voice. Or squeak her favourite toy, or something. The more you try to 'order' or physically move her off the bed, the more defensive she will come, maybe even giving you a dirty look when you come into the bedroom. In time, she might even pop straight off the bed when you come into the room, happily looking to you for a treat. This is what happened with my dog and he can be REALLY grumpy!
     
  3. Shalista

    Shalista Member Registered

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    Ill be honest, i have a 13lb rat terrier and i never move him. i know he doesn't like it. So he never gets picked up, NEVER gets carried, and if he's in a comfy spot on the bed i contort myself to sleep around him. are there times when he absolutely HAS to be picked up? yeah, but i try to avoid it. I know he's not comfortable being picked up so i really try to avoid it unless i HAVE to. That being said @JudyN has some pretty solid advice so I'd listen to her.
     
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  4. Rhythmpig

    Rhythmpig Member Registered

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    I had a Border Terrier who was grumpy like this. He growled at me a few times when he was on the bed. The lesson had to be learnt. He was quickly told to get down off of the bed and sent away. He had to learn it was my bed and he was the guest on it, not me. Eventually he would come and sit and look at me while I was in bed. When I thought he was ready,I invited him to join me,he soon learnt.
     
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  5. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    Our dog will very softly growl (it almost sounds alike a purr!) at me if I pet him when he's in his bed, and I just leave him alone then. I think it's his way of saying, "this is my space and I'd rather be left alone", so that's what happens. Perhaps your dog's reaction is something similar.
     
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  6. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Active Member Registered

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    My terrier is exactly the same , bless her :rolleyes: we just ignore her and she stops growling at us , hates being touched in her bed too, terriers are funny little dogs !
     
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  7. Shalista

    Shalista Member Registered

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    Terriers have very strong opinions as to what is and is not allowed. :rolleyes:
     
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  8. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Active Member Registered

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    They certainly do ! Our Lily is 9 and a half now and been the same since she was 4 months old ...you have to love them though :rolleyes: strange thing is she’s terrified of the hoover, clanging pots and pans, tape measures...the list goes on ;)
     
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  9. Derekmr

    Derekmr Member Registered

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    It's not you, it's the terrier in her, my willow is the same with my daughter if she tries to pick her up, and growls at us all if we move her,.
    Don't let it get you down, she still loves you.
     
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  10. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Mine does that even when he came to me for the cuddles :confused:
     
  11. Robyn Wilson

    Robyn Wilson New Member Registered

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    Thanks, I’ve already started asking her to move and she does!!
     
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