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New rescue whippet

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by RGC, Aug 25, 2020.

  1. RGC

    RGC Well-Known Member Registered

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    Took on a 3 year old rescue in November 2019. Initially very nervous of people especially men. She’s now much better although she has the occasional set back as if she’s experiencing a flashback. Even with me (a male) my approach has to be subtle. She doesn’t seem to understand the sit command even when dangling a treat above her. Attempts to gently get her to sit are a complete failure - it’s as tho’ she’s been made to sit by someone force to her back.
    A very positive advance is the car - at first she would drool, shake and eventually throw up. At last she associates the car with happy events, walks, meeting other dogs - fun things. She has one helluva lot of problems but I hope we’ll get there (during my lifetime!).
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Maybe she finds a sit uncomfortable? To be honest, it's not a behaviour worth stressing about (I'm sure you aren't, just since you mention it)
     
  3. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Long-backed dogs find 'sit' uncomfortable, and deep-chested dogs find the same with 'down'. Really, neither is necessary. I have had a number of lurchers (long backs, deep chests) and I teach them to 'stand'.

    It could also be that your dog has been put in a 'sit' and then punished. It's amazing how many people do this.
     
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Does she ever sit of her own accord? Sighthounds often find sitting uncomfortable, and some physically can't do it. My sighthound will sit on cue, but he thinks of it as a 'party trick', if you like - as soon as I say 'good boy' or give him the treat, he's up again. Just focus on cues like 'wait' or 'down', which will serve the same purpose.

    If she ever sits of her own accord, you could try rewarding the action and saying the word. Then she might put two and two together and offering the behaviour.

    Cross-posted with Hemlock!
     
  5. RGC

    RGC Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thank you for your response. Yes, she does sit voluntarily. It’s just a matter of our responding in time. She understands “wait” and will react accordingly. I like to think that we’re quite au fait with whippets and their traits having had two rescued waifs before (now gone to that pet shop in the sky). They both understood “sit”, “stay”, “down” and “wait” but God knows what this one’s gone through. Once again, big thanks.
     
  6. RGC

    RGC Well-Known Member Registered

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    You’re quite right - it’s not a big issue - more trying to get her to connect with me. Believe me, I’ve never raised my voice to her. When she’s doing (or has done) something wrong she gets “Oh dear, was that a good idea?” in a subdued tone which she does pick up.
     

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