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New with a poo eating dog! Help, please!

Discussion in 'General Dog Forum' started by SidC, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. SidC

    SidC New Member Registered

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    Hi all,
    I’m desperate for some advice please.
    I have a 1 year old whippet male. Ever since a pup he has eaten his own and any other creatures poo he can find.....
    (He did come from a very big litter and a house with lots of other dogs so I presume he’s learnt it from his mother.)
    He’s fed very well, a very good quality food and a lot more than he probably needs.
    He knows the leave command but does not listen when poo is involved.
    I’ve tried everything, I pick it up immediately, I’ve put pineapple juice on his food, anti poo eating tablets on his food from the vets, spray him with water when I catch him, tell him off, put chilli sauce on it, etc etc.
    I really don’t know what else to try.
    I have two small children so understandably don’t want him licking them after he’s done it.
    He’s such a lovely dog but this is really getting me down, please help.
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    First, please stop spraying him with water, that won't help especially if it is a nervous habit in which case it will add to his anxiety and make him worse. The other behavioural cause could be that it gets him attention (to a dog any reaction is attention) so hard as it is try not to react.

    If it isn't behavioural it is likely he either lacks something in his diet; or there is something in the diet of the other animal that still remains nutritional in their poo. The fact he is indiscriminate suggests it isn't the latter though. What food is he on?

    Some people find adding live natural yoghurt to the food helps - a dessert spoonful daily should be about right for a whippet. I would do that and then look at managing the behaviour. Obviously pick up his poo immediately, and keep him on lead until he gets out of the habit.
     
  3. SidC

    SidC New Member Registered

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    Thanks
     
  4. SidC

    SidC New Member Registered

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    Thanks Joanne.
    I don’t react or try not too, the water thing I only did a couple of times as it upset me. As I say he’s such a lovely dog I would hate for him to be unhappy.
    He’s on Simpson’s lamb and rice sensitive and he has any good quality scraps, left over veg and meat.
    I will try the yoghurt.
    And I immediately pick up his poo, it’s just with a 4 month old baby he’s sometimes quicker than I am!
     
  5. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

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    I hate to say it but if he knows the command (Remy knew spit and would obey at distance if I was quick) then maybe a muzzle is your best option provided this isnt something medical..
     
  6. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    In my experience, a muzzle won't help - an open muzzle like in the pic below can act like a potato masher - the dog can still eat the poo and end up with a horrible mess on his muzzle, and one that restricts mouth opening is uncomfortable and dangerous - particularly for a whippet and particularly in hot weather.

    [​IMG]

    What might help is adding more veggies in his diet, either lightly steamed or thoroughly pureed. You can also buy powders, such as Dorwest Easy Green, to add to the food instead or as well. Anecdotally, it's also said that some dogs stop poo eating when they change to a raw diet.
     
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  7. Biker John

    Biker John Well-Known Member Registered

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    Only a single example so not proof of anything, but I took in a three year old Shih Tzu, he was a lovely happy dog that was previously feed on a good kibble, (well an expensive one at least), and he ate dog poo. Now I told him NO firmly, (not shouting just firm). And I switched him to RAW food. It took a couple of months but he gradually reduced then stopped doing it. Now it could be the command, it could be the diet or he could just have changed his habbit or it was some combination I will never know.
     
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  8. millymojo1

    millymojo1 New Member Registered

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    I’m sure I’ve heard that giving your dog a banana every day is a cure...
     
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  9. SidC

    SidC New Member Registered

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    I’ll try anything. Thanks
     
  10. millymojo1

    millymojo1 New Member Registered

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    Something to do with potassium deficiency. Keep us updated, good luck.
     
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  11. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    I know a fox terrier that has only ever had a raw diet and she eats her own poo(if she gets the chance!) and another dog on a high quality kibble that does the same.. someone told me liver added to the diet once a week may help, this lady had whippets and one had this habit and the liver addition worked for her, but I have no science behind this theory! Good luck..
     
  12. Whippylove

    Whippylove Well-Known Member Registered

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    My 21 mth old whippet eats my older whippets poo, i bought him a muzzle off ebay that has the bottom filled in to stop them picking things up when my back is turned! I always make sure i lift the poo straight away but accidents happen lol i gave my 3 live yoghurt with their meals but nothing stops Oliver!
     
  13. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    I'd use a basket-muzzle sized to fit the dog's face, but EXTRA DEEP -- with space between the end of the dog's nose, & the interior of the basket at the front.
    then i'd cover the very front with a solid piece of lightweight sheet-metal, sturdy aluminum-foil would work, from a pie-pan or other pressed object - turn the edges under, punch REINFORCED holes to allow cable-ties or other to secure it ,at the 4 corners. // His air-flow is not affected, he can't snack, & he can't smash poop-piles effectively.

    - terry

    .
     
  14. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I was told that a muzzle with an even partially covered nose, such as this style, isn't suitable for running & play, but is really designed for greyhounds in kennels/travelling:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Don-Pare-Greyhound-Muzzle-Running/dp/B008J4X90W

    And that for running, they should wear a more open style, like this:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Don-Pare-greyhound-Lurcher-Amathings/dp/B01LY7VX3M

    I tend to compromise, and use the former type of muzzle in the colder months and swap to the lighter more open one on summer. Because of what I've been told, I've always thought that a stool guard wouldn't be safe for running and play. Would you disagree with that?

    I tend to compromise, and use the former type of muzzle in the colder months and swap to the lighter more open one on summer. But if the former one does restrict airflow, then a stool guard will restrict it even more, holes or not.
     
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