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Pressure sores?

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by JudyN, Jun 6, 2021.

  1. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I'm guessing this is a pressure sore on Jasper's elbow:

    IMG_9325.JPG
    Are pressure sores common in older bony dogs? It doesn't seem to be bothering him, and the skin isn't broken - is there anything I should do? He has his choice of soft dog beds and carpet.

    Or could there be another cause?
     
  2. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    Hi Judy. Just wondering if Jasper is putting on a bit of weight in his old age, maybe this or being less active himself during the day in general. o_O
     
  3. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

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    I have seen older dogs with similar things on bony parts ...you could try putting some vaseline on to keep it soft...or sudocreme if he wont lick it ....
     
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    @excuseme, he's not put on weight - judging by eye, anyway, as I've not been able to get him weighed for over a year. But he is less active - and of course being a sighthound, does spend a lot of time lying around.

    @Tinytom, thanks - I'll try your suggestions.
     
  5. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

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    If he would let you it maybe a good idea to pad the area and put a bit of vet wrap over just to prevent the sore breaking open ;);)
     
  6. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I can't see that happening, I'm afraid. Or if he did let me put it on (which would involve a LOT of distraction), I probably wouldn't be able to stop him removing it.

    I tried desensitising him to Vetwrap at one time - he got nervous if I just laid a bit over his paw...
     
  7. Tinytom

    Tinytom Well-Known Member Registered

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    Its a tricky one ....hopefully if its kept soft it shouldnt break open ...
     
  8. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    They can be and like with people pressure sores are classified as a chronic condition and difficult to treat ...some information Pressure Sores in Pets: Treatment & Prevention | Decubital Ulcer Care

    As they are caused by less moving around and laying for time on one area, then blood supply is important, so to increase blood supply either/or encourage to get up and walk around more, massage is also good at increasing the blood supply to the area and if it is hardening skin then Aqueous cream ( which is used in the burns units in hospital) is safe to use on dogs and it keeps the area moisturised and unlike vasaline ( which can cause upset tummies in dogs if they lick it) aqueous cream is OK if they lick it off
     
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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  10. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Aloe vera gel is another safe and effective option.
     
  11. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    Thank you Hemlock :)
     
  12. Flobo

    Flobo Well-Known Member Registered Partner

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    We used to use sheepskin cuffs on people for heels/elbows etc, protecting the areas as well as regular changes of position. I know Jasper wouldn't wear one as you said above but would he cope with you maybe sliding something soft/padded under his elbow whilst he's laying down or would that immediately disturb him?? But then if it does disturb him it would prompt a position change, so win win!!:D though I would imagine him getting a bit grumpy if that happened too often!:eek:
     
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  13. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    He doesn't like being messed with when he's on his bed.... :confused: I would consider getting a sheepskin throw so all of him is cushioned, but don't know if it would be much getter than his memory foam bed - he rarely lies on hard surfaces (apart from grass).

    This may have been aggravated by the fact that we had a long drive to a holiday location last week and as he can't sprawl out in the car, he tends to have his leg bent on that side, so the skin is pulled thinner over that joint. Hopefully once we're home, he can do more of his normal sprawling. We're actually cutting the holiday short as he's finding it all a bit stressful and at his age, he really doesn't need that. At least we have met Mr R's sister & family and scattered their parents' ashes, and met a very dear old schoolfriend, so that's the important stuff done :)

    I rubbed some aqueous cream on earlier, which he was fine with. The skin felt a little rough, but it's not broken at all. Actually, I might put some on my own elbows too...
     
  14. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I was introduced to aqueous cream decades ago in the burns unit in hospital, so have used it as a ( human) moisturiser for years and it can be used on broken/damaged skin too and with no perfumes and cheap I have a tube in my car, bathroom and a pot of it in the dog medicine cabinet ( along with another staple Aloe Vera gel) I like things that are safe for both people and pets.
    You can also get Aqueous cream with Calamine that can help relieve itching caused by minor skin irritations, like allergies to pollen/grass/poisonous or stinging plants which lots of dogs get itchy tummies from at this time of the year...I find Aloe Vera gel put on their tummy of those dogs who suffer before going out puts a film on their skin helps and aqueous cream with calamine when they get home
     
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  15. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    A sheepskin might help @JudyN as it sort of moves with the dog iykwim?
     
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  16. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I am sure it will help him and buying a couple of sheepskin rugs which you can easily move around doesn't look so bad as orthopedic dogs beds everywhere
     
  17. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I'll see how he goes once we're home, and if it doesn't clear up, I might well invest in a sheepskin... or a sheepskin per bed... He's a lurcher, though, he'll probably make a point of lying with nothing but his bum or a paw on it. That's assuming he doesn't try to eat it, sheep being made of food.

    I wonder if I can find old manky ones on eBay?
     
  18. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    Try gumtree I bought a double sized one for £10 ...the cat tries to claim it and the dogs will stand and watch her until she moves
     
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