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Puppy nipping

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by PupC, May 8, 2021.

  1. PupC

    PupC Member Registered

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    Hi there can anyone share top tips for avoiding being nipped/chewed/bitten - I know my 10 week old puppy is only playing. We’ve tried having toys ready and also the ignoring ( turning away) these sometimes work but when she’s in the moment all things and stuff parts are game play - ouch!
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    See if this helps but please do come back with any questions. One thing though - you will have had your puppy for about 2 weeks, so try not to chop and change between methods - pick one thing and be consistent, it gives a far clearer message (with any training).

    Puppy biting | Dog Forum | dogforum.co.uk
     
  3. PupC

    PupC Member Registered

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    Thank you
     
  4. CoCo2014

    CoCo2014 Member Registered

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    Puppy mouthing is the natural way they learn, you need to teach your pup bite inhibition.
    I personally totally ignore an mouthing by my puppies, if they start to mouth my hands I form fists with my thumbs tucked in and cross my arms, I say nothing & make no noise. I get up & walk away & go out of the room & close the door behind me & stay out of sight for 30 to 60 seconds. This makes mouthing me boring & non rewarding.

    I also always have lots of tuggies that are long enough to keep the puppy's mouth off my hands, plus a latex squeaky toy that I can distract the puppy if he/she goes OTT or starts zoomies.

    I also do a fair bit of clicker training from day one in very short sessions.
     
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  5. PupC

    PupC Member Registered

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    Thank you - think we will continue with the ignore the unwanted and walk away.
     
  6. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    Take courage - they really do grow out of it and there IS light at the end of the tunnel!
     
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  7. Ash2021

    Ash2021 Member Registered

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    I feel your pain, my 14 week old pup was / is the same (I say was and is, as it has got less and less, I not going to say totally stopped yet )

    As others have said stick to one method - we use the same method that coco2014 has said above
     
  8. PupC

    PupC Member Registered

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    This pleases me
     
  9. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    All human babies and young pups put everything in their mouths it is a way they learn about the world around them, so very normal, so 'not' a bad behaviour, but pups sharp teeth hurt and it is important you don't make it an exciting game, so depending on your pups personality will depend on what works...some pups will instantly back off with an ouch, others it will encourage, so you need to find ONE which you can be consistant with and possibly the best is be boring, with a tiny pup ....silence, getting up stops the 'game' and walk out/close the door, a minute is enough time to 'break' the 'game' and you repeat, repeat, repeat each and every time....so you will be getting up and out lots of times before it realises.
    The other thing to remember is pups are teething and dogs know biting down/chewing releives the anxiety of the pain of teething, so buy some carrots put them in the fridge so they are cold and exchange your fingers/arms/hands with a carrot... you both get what you want, you do not get mouthed and your pup gets something nice and cold, safe and so it can releive the pain/anxiety either chewing it or using it as a toy...so no blame, no 'correcting' a normal behaviour just on the right thing and that is not you...you just don't want your pup learning it is acceptable to mouth you which in time will turn into harder bites as it learn you accept being used as a chewing toy and it gets to be an exciting 'game'
     

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