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Tick treatments

Discussion in 'Dog Health' started by Ash2021, Apr 17, 2021.

  1. Ash2021

    Ash2021 Member Registered

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    I have 12 week old puppy and found 2 ticks so far

    just wondering what tick treatments you use or would use for a 12 week old puppy?

    thanks in advance
     
  2. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    We use Frontline. It's OK to use on puppies (I believe from 8 weeks), but - it's not the most effective solution.
    Not the most effective, but on the other hand - not as potentially harmful as some others.
    When selecting tick prevention approach - we went with the milder one.
    This means that we still check the dog for ticks every time we come back from walks during tick season.
     
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  3. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    I just remove the ticks when I see them. I live in sheep/deer country so there are always ticks.
     
  4. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    I use neem as a flea/tick/mite 'treatment' so my dogs don't get them ( and they are daily around sheep so highly likely they would)
    I asked my vet what he used for his dogs ( he also has sheep) or if someone came in to see him expecting him to say some 'vet treatment' or physical removal and he said any oil/even butter on the tick as it stops the tick breathing and they release, dry up and fall off.
     
  5. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I've heard that is not recommended, because the stress on the tick can cause it to regurgitate the blood it has already drawn from the host back into the bloodstream and that is how Lyme disease is contracted.
     
  6. Inka

    Inka Active Member Registered

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    After the ticks prolonged attachment/feeding, the engorged tick transmits the toxin to its host....which is why I use neem that stops them attaching in the first place
     
  7. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Contrary to popular opinion, you do NOT want to use petroleum jelly, rubbing alcohol, oils /butter, paraffin, nail polish remover or any liquid solutions to stimulate the tick to release its grip. Do NOT apply a freezing agent, or burn the tick with a cigarette, lighter or match.”

    All these methods may get a tick to release its grip, but they also stress the tick and thereby significantly increase the chances of it infecting your dog.

    There really are only two safe ways to remove an attached tick: with fine-tipped (precision) tweezers or with a tick-removal tool like Tick Twister.


    Source - How To Safely Remove Ticks From Your Pet
     
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  8. Richard & Patsy

    Richard & Patsy Member Registered

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    Has anyone had their dog vaccinated against canine Lyme disease? I am looking into it as Sitka is high risk - he does lots of running through grasslands with high deer populations. I pull ticks off him using the twisting tool technique.
     

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