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Dog Breeding

Discussion in 'Dog Showing' started by liza, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. liza

    liza New Member Registered

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    i have just been told you are not allowed to line breed anymore and you have got to breed to the fourth generation of you pedigree

    so is it worth having an affix
     
  2. posh totty

    posh totty whippet servant Registered

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    why not have an affix? to me its more like my furry kids all having the same surname? many people on here dont breed but have an affix as its personal to them and their dogs? a collective name for all ? even my lurchers race under the Highisland banner ?
     
  3. k4tie-d

    k4tie-d StarR Collars Registered

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    i agree with tanya,

    i dont breed and probabily never will, but my OH got me a affix for my xmas, as i wanted one to show my girls (and any future whippys) to all have a connection :thumbsup:
     
  4. June Jonigk

    June Jonigk Active Member Registered

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    I feel the same way, all of them having the family name :huggles:
     
  5. June Jonigk

    June Jonigk Active Member Registered

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    That's quite interesting - where did that information come from?
     
  6. liza

    liza New Member Registered

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    a friend of mine who is an accreditted breeder got a news letter and the information was on there about breeding
     
  7. dessie

    dessie New Member Registered

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    I think you will find that the KC have stated that, as of 1 March 2009, they will not register puppies from in-bred matings, i.e. father/daughter, mother/son, brother/sister, unless there are exceptional circumstances (what they might be goodness (or the KC) only knows).

    Good for them I say and about time too.
     
  8. WIGGY

    WIGGY New Member Registered

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    Here here. its about time. Can only help the breeds in the long run. :))
     
  9. T Hoare

    T Hoare New Member Registered

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    I am of the same opinion.
     
  10. moonlake

    moonlake New Member Registered

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    I don't think that can be right - all the dogs and most of the breeders in the 4th generation of the bitch I plan to mate next are dead :( What exactly did the newsletter say?

    Gay

    www.moonlake.co.uk
     
  11. jazad

    jazad New Member Registered

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    FYI

    From the KC website:

    Kennel Club Announces Healthy New Year Regulations for Pedigree Dogs

    The Kennel Club, in the next stage of its ‘Fit for Function: Fit For Life’ campaign, today released the results of its review of all breed standards to ensure that all dogs are healthy, of good temperament and fit for their original function, and announced that it will introduce strict new rules to ban the breeding of close relatives, in a move that will ensure that pedigree dogs go into 2009 with the best chance of living happy, healthy lives.

    The breed standards - the picture in words that describes each breed of dog - have been revised so that they will not include anything that could in any way be interpreted as encouraging features that might prevent a dog from breathing, walking and seeing freely. This will help to prevent the practice of exaggeration, where features that are perceived to be desirable, such as a short muzzle or loose skin, are made more prominent by breeders, and which can have detrimental effects on a dog’s health. The changes represent a major additional step forward for the long term health and welfare of dogs of all breeds and have been made following a series of reviews, which included breed experts and independent scientific and veterinary experts. Breed Standards are constantly reviewed by the Kennel Club and their development has benefited from extensive research that has been funded by the Kennel Club in conjunction with renowned veterinary research centres over the past 40 years.

    Examples of the suggested amendments include a revised standard for the Shar Pei, which removes the exaggeration of loose skin folds across the neck, skull and legs. Other changes include the preclusion of excessive weight in Labradors and a move to stop breeders exaggerating substance in Clumber Spaniels, in order to ensure they would be fit for their original purpose of working in the field.

    Marc Abraham, Kennel Club Veterinary Advisor, said: “The Kennel Club should be applauded for its efforts to improve the health of pedigree dogs. The changes that have been announced today will leave breeders and judges in no doubt about their responsibilities to safeguard the health and welfare of dogs, first and foremost. The Kennel Club has grasped the opportunities that developments in science and technology have given it to improve pedigree health and is at the forefront of research in this area. I hope that all those who care about the health and welfare of pedigree dogs will unite with the Kennel Club and work productively with them so that we can all reach our shared goal of achieving the best possible future for dogs.”

    All judges will be expected to use the revised standards at Crufts 2009, which will be a showcase for healthy, well adjusted dogs. The Kennel Club show regulations have also been amended to lay down more clearly than ever, a judge’s duty only to reward those dogs that are healthy representatives of their breed, at all Kennel Club licensed shows. Judges will have the authority to remove from competition completely any dog that appears to be unhealthy and Kennel Club officials and show officials are expected to refer any dogs that they believe to be unhealthy to the on-site vet, who can authorise the dog’s removal from further competition at that show.

    In a further move, the Kennel Club has announced that it will crack down on the small number of breeders who continue to use the practice of mating close relatives by refusing to register those puppies that are born from any mother/son, father/daughter or brother/sister mating, taking place on or after 1st March 2009. Departures from this principle will only be made in exceptional circumstances or for scientifically proven welfare reasons. Kennel Club research into the genetic diversity of all breeds in the UK is ongoing and further changes will be considered in the future, on a breed specific basis.

    Additionally, all dog owners and breeders will be required to permanently identify their dogs, via microchip or tattoo, from January 2010, in order to participate in the Kennel Club/British Veterinary Association health schemes for eye disease and hip and elbow dysplasia. These schemes have been in place for many years and give dog owners in relevant breeds the opportunity to test for a number of common disorders; this move is introduced, at the express request of the veterinary profession, to ensure the fairness and accuracy of the results of the schemes.

    Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club spokesperson, said: “We want the New Year to begin well for pedigree dogs and the changes that have been announced today underline the Kennel Club’s deep commitment to ensuring that every pedigree dog has the best possible chance of leading a happy, healthy life.

    “Our revised breed standards are underpinned by new regulations, which further support show judges in their right to remove from competition those dogs who stray from the breed standard in a way that is detrimental to their health. Dog shows attract a great deal of public support in this country and are designed to celebrate and reward only those dogs that are healthy representatives of their breed and are of good temperament. We are determined to make sure that this is, and remains, so.

    “We are pleased to make these announcements but we cannot afford to become complacent and we will continue to work with the institutions and organisations who share our determination continually to improve the health and welfare of all dogs.”

    To find out more about the revised breed standards visit http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/item/2223.
     
  12. June Jonigk

    June Jonigk Active Member Registered

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    It was the 4th generation thing I didn't understand either. I think it's a good move not to accept registration for very close breeding :thumbsup:
     
  13. dragonfly

    dragonfly New Member Registered

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    Why on earth do you have to linebreed to have an affix?

    Cathie
     
  14. aslan

    aslan a totally addicted Registered

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    These matings are "inbreeding" not linebreeding

    I can't find that statement in the newsletter

    If someone is only going to dabble in breeding with one litter then perhaps they might not bother with an affix - but then one might ask should they bother with breeding at all?

    If one is going to be serious about breeding and do one's homework and become a breeder then I think most certainly an affix is worth having to identify you and your dogs in current and for future generations.
     
  15. JAX

    JAX New Member Registered

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    I cant see how that sort of Info can come out before the breed clubs and Press arnt informed somehow .

    Trouble is, this could make some folks do false pedigrees too :eek:

    Personnally id sooner do line bred pedigrees than do designer x breeds :angry:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 28, 2009
  16. 05whippet

    05whippet New Member Registered

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  17. quintessence

    quintessence New Member Registered

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    You will need to refer to The Kennel Club Liza and ask about the newsletter, if you use the contact box on their website they are usually pretty good at responding. Things are moving a pace at the moment, but I think you will find that the statement Dessie quoted is the one your friend is referring to.

    Jenny
     
  18. Noise

    Noise New Member Registered

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    um, it seems pretty clear to me, no close matings. no mention of ban on linebreeding.
     
  19. k4tie-d

    k4tie-d StarR Collars Registered

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    my observation of this threaf is that if you have been "close/line/in breeding for a while then all the dogs in your pedigree will be extreamly close related,

    ie if your doing mother/son mating the mother is also the grandmother on the sire side, and then if you continued on by doing say father/daughter the mother becomes great grandmother on sire side and grandmother on dams side, and the father is also the grand father and the same for the rest of the relatives in the line behinde each dog. so if you have been line/close/ inbreeding for a few years you may not be able to use any dogs back to the forth gen???

    sorry if im totaly got the wrong end of the stick, im not sure on the difference between line breending and in breeding so im maybe totally wrong :sweating:
     
  20. Seraphina

    Seraphina Active Member Registered

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    Well the next step will be to have all registered dogs microchipped and then DNA profiled. It is already being done here, all our dogs are microchipped and many of us have ours profiled. I had my 5 profiled, and I am planning to have my next litter profiled and get their pedigree certified.

    Anyway as the info from the enclosed KC newsletter goes it seems that you will be able to linebreed to second cousins and other slightly less related dogs.
     

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