The Most Dog Friendly Community Online
Join and Discover the Best Things to do with your Dog

Welcome to Our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Older dogs

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by VictorK, Nov 6, 2018.

Tags:
< Hi | CBD oil >
  1. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    As I get older, I'm finding that what I eat and the amount of exercise I need are changing. I wonder if it's the same for my dog? He's getting on too, but doesn't show any signs of slowing down but I don't want to let him 'overdo' things and so I thought I'd see what other owners' experiences are.
     
  2. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I often think about that too, I’m now 66 :eek: and can’t walk as far as I used to , my two girls are both nearly 9 and a half , the Springer shows no signs of slowing down but is happy and relaxed with two 40 min walks a day, sometimes it’s longer if I've got the energy ;) the terrier would sooner not even go for a walk ! They both eat much the same as they always have and are not overweight, now me...find eating too much makes me feel awful these days so have to eat a lot less ....but the weight seems to stay the same :D just not fair :( I’ll just keep walking the girls the same until they tell me different :)
     
    VictorK likes this.
  3. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    My dog's a Patterdale/Springer cross, so - like your springer - at even at 10+ years would go on forever. He gets a 20 minute walk in the morning, plus a 40-60 minute one in the late afternoon and - again, like yours - is happy and relaxed. If anything, he appears hungrier and hasn't put on any extra weight when we've upped his feed a bit. Shame we're not the same, eh?:emoji_fries: I'll keep on keeping on then, apart from the chips that is!:(
     
    Mayblossom likes this.
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,252
    Likes Received:
    3,279
    Trophy Points:
    113
    If being hungrier is a recent thing, I've noticed that my dog drops weight in colder weather unless I up his food (I can't say he's hungrier because in his mind he's always hungry!). Last winter was the first time I noticed this (he's nearly 9) so maybe it's age related?

    It's worth bearing in mind that if a dog clearly wants to keep going, given the choice he'd rather stay as active as possible and have as much fun as possible now than have his walks shortened, even if the consequence was a few more aches and pains down the line. Same with us to an extent - it's often better to keep going despite a few aches and pains rather than grind to a halt. It's just a shame that all that exercise doesn't seem to shift our weight... think of it as muscle gain!
     
    Ragsysmum, Mayblossom and VictorK like this.
  5. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I agree with your sentiments entirely. "The more you do, the more you can do" has always been one of my sayings, (with the reverse just as accurate I reckon), and there's no doubt that it adds to our feeling of well-being. Interesting about the cold weather though. I suppose that more energy's needed to keep their systems going, just the same as ours. Trouble is, it doesn't just keep us warmer - it adds to that "muscle"!
     
    Mayblossom likes this.
  6. Jack-Russell-Lover

    Jack-Russell-Lover Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    422
    Trophy Points:
    63
    We said goodbye to our Collie cross a couple of years ago at age 14, although for a few weeks before he died he was quite slow and ill, before that period of going downhill he payed with his toys and still loved his walkies! I've got pictures of him playing with his ball in the garden at the end of May of that year and we lost him beginning of that September.
    It just depends on the dog, they're all different :)
     
    VictorK likes this.
  7. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    14 was the age at which our 'Polo' Jack Russell/Springer cross made. Sorry to hear about your loss; it's brought back some sad memories for us too, some 19 years since we lost him. From what you say, the signs will probably be there to see - excepting any 'illness' that might occur, they'll start to visibly slow down when they just can't keep going any more. Seeing and understanding that will help us to come to terms with inevitable, as well as to help make their old-age as happy and comfortable as possible.
     
  8. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,069
    Likes Received:
    816
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I always keep our older girls slim and light weight, and as active as possible. Our last 2 oldies, both reached 14, they continued with normal walks and joined in with hunting their favourite woods up to their very last day. Fantastic little dogs " Working Cocker Spaniels".
    We have 6 at the moment and our oldest is only 8.5 years, we ourselves are 69 and 73. We still walk on the downs with the girls and are beating this season 2 to 3 days each week. (unfortunately it is us who are starting to slow down, but the girls keep us going!)
     
  9. Mad Murphy

    Mad Murphy Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    859
    Likes Received:
    1,482
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Benny was often given the choice of short path or long way round.. The week before he passed aged 15 I wrote about what a lovely walk we had had, I handnt taken photos because there were none to do it justice. He had walked 2,5 km.
    He dropped a little weight in the last couple of weeks before he died but was still a fine looking boy.

    I think you know your dog you know what state of health they are in and I think its a very individual thing but take your cue from your dog.. Of course you have to think about things such as weather conditions or throwing a ball for a very old dog in the same way you wouldnt send your granny snowboarding.
     
    VictorK and Mayblossom like this.
  10. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I think that being under- rather than over-weight is always going to keep them fit. That's probably far easier with the spaniel type dogs that have been mentioned today, as opposed to some of the 'naturally larger' ones you see out and about. They're 'naturally busier' and don't have much opportunity to pile on the pounds because they burn it all off. As I said in a previous post, the more you do, the more you can do and yourselves sound to be greatly helped doing this with your dogs. I used to go beating with my Jack Russell/Springer, but he was too good at getting the birds on the ground rather than just flushing them. The Keeper wasn't to keen on that behavious, so we gave up pretty quickly!
     
    excuseme and Mayblossom like this.
  11. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I think as long as our dogs keep going then we will too :rolleyes: they give you a purpose to go out, as I know, without them, I wouldn't go out walking in all weathers . I’m a lot fitter than I would be without them :) Luckily I’m healthy , as are the girls :rolleyes: so hopefully we have a good few more years together .
     
    Ragsysmum, excuseme and VictorK like this.
  12. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Taking Granny snowboarding, eh? She might like that, although on the other hand it might finish her off! Sounds like a bit of a 'Mad' idea, Mr Murphy!! A theme that's run through this topic is that of taking a cue from your dog, and I think that's excellent advice. My dog would chase after any thrown objects all day long, but it's obvious to see the results in him perhaps limping the following day, so discretion is a must no matter how pleadingly they look at you whenever there's some stick-like obkect in your hand.
     
    Mayblossom likes this.
  13. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    And therein lies another issue for us. I often think that I wouldn't get anywhere near as much exercise without Rufus, and that when he eventually toddles of this mortal coil that I'd have to get another dog. However, he's such a brilliant animal (attentive, obedient, fun - bombproof really) that I might automatically think A N Other dog would be the same. Must remember to remove my rose-tinted spectacles when the time comes.
     
    excuseme likes this.
  14. Mayblossom

    Mayblossom Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    279
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I’m hoping by the time mine go to doggy heaven I’ll be zooming round on a four wheeled drive motorised scooter :D:D
     
    excuseme and VictorK like this.
  15. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Just be careful you don't run over any less-old dogs, or their owners! Mind you, given the pace of technology, the dogs might have motorised scooters of their own by then.... No, seriously, reading the great responses I've already been kindly offered, the main thing is to allow them to go abut their normal activities and only review those when you're aware that they're flagging.
     
    Mode Prints and Mayblossom like this.
  16. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    2,252
    Likes Received:
    3,279
    Trophy Points:
    113
    That's so true, even with younger dogs - I had to stop using the ball chucker with Jasper when he was only about 5, because the sudden deceleration, twisting and reaching down to grab the ball really messed with his joints. Having the speed of an Exocet missile and the turning circle of the Ark Royal didn't help.
     
    merlina, Mad Murphy and VictorK like this.
  17. VictorK

    VictorK New Member Registered

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Your description's really lifelike! Makes me wince just to think of it. When Rufus did that, I worried that the replacement joints he had in his back 'knees' when he was only about 18 months old (and before we took him over) would pop apart. They've lasted really well when you think what they've been through, and the phenomenal cost's proved more than worth it.
     
  18. Rhythmpig

    Rhythmpig Member Registered

    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    18
    My old girl is knocking on the door of being 16. I think she as discovered the fountain of eternal youth. She is out on the moors three times a day without fail. This morning she set off running down the footpath,when I caught up with her,she was happily digging a nice hole. She isn't show any signs of slowing down at all...and she's eating like a bloody horse.
     
    VictorK and Mad Murphy like this.
  19. merlina

    merlina Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    434
    Likes Received:
    577
    Trophy Points:
    93
    These days it seems you see quite a few very fat older dogs which is really doing them no favours- the only other thing weight related in the older dog is not to let them get underweight either. Any illness or infection means they can struggle to regain health with very little to call on after fasting say. So a bit of fat can actually come in handy and make the difference between survival and not.
     
    VictorK likes this.
  20. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

    Messages:
    1,069
    Likes Received:
    816
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Unfortunately there are a lot of people who don't know the difference between a "little" fat and a "lot" of fat.
    I believe there is a lot of difference between lightweight and healthy and fat of any kind :rolleyes:.
     
    VictorK likes this.
< Hi | CBD oil >

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.