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Raw for puppy - concerns

Discussion in 'Dog Food and Diet' started by kbb68, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. kbb68

    kbb68 New Member Registered

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    We have a new whippet puppy that has been feed on a raw diet (chicken mince and bone) since weaning (Chicken Mince with Bone - theyloveit.co.uk). I took him to the vets for his first jabs yesterday and it was suggested that he may not be getting all the vitamins and minerals he needs from this raw diet and that it would be better to move him to a 'complete' dry diet. So now I'm very concerned, what should I do for the best? If I do decide to move him to a dry diet how is it best to transition?
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Vets get a pitifully low amount of training in nutrition and often it is sponsored or supplied by a dog food company so not exactly impartial. I would like to see a small amount of liver but other than that, your food looks excellent. @excuseme and @JudyN may be able to add more.
     
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  3. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    I agree with JoanneF, vets aren't knowledgeable with raw feeding and even those who know it can be balanced may worry that the owners won't 'do it right', which is understandable.

    I've no experience of rearing puppies onto raw, but my advice would be to gradually introduce small amounts of liver and other offal, a larger variety of proteins (e.g. lamb, rabbit, fish), and some 'whole bones' such as chicken wings or carcasses (the latter are excellent for tooth cleaning). Raw eggs, including the shell, can be a good addition (chicken eggs don't agree with my lad's digestion so he gets raw quail eggs), and the odd tin of oily fish such as sardines.

    Some people like to add fruit and veg, others don't - if you do, it should ideally be either lightly steamed or thoroughly pureed. You can also get powdered supplements like SmartBarf. Strictly speaking they should't be needed, but can give peace of mind, like multivitamins for humans.

    Ratios to aim for are 80% muscle meat, 10% bone, 5% liver and 5% other offal. Dogs vary though - the general rule is if their poos are too soft, reduce offal and increase bone, and if they are too firm, vice versa. Build up the offal, particularly liver, gradually or you may live to regret it! Some dogs can have an occasional liver meal, others have to have their liver spread across the week to prevent runny bums.

    You can also get 'complete' raw blends, the drawbacks being that they don't contain whole bone and that the composition might not agree with your dog. But they might work great for yours!
     
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  4. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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    It looks as if @JudyN has said it all quiet perfectly.
    A raw diet needs a variety of products, meat types including fat, skin, gristle and various offal, you do not need to balance your food daily, with a raw diet this will balance itself over a period of a few weeks.
    Bones are essential, both for the calcium and teeth cleaning.
    Puppies are very easy to introduce different meat products, unlike kibbles.
    Our vets have very little training with regards Nutrition!
    Please "Google", Myths About Raw Feeding, "Vets are thoroughly Qualified to Dispense Nutritional Advice".

    There is a very handy little book that can be obtained FREE, if you register with the "Honeys" website; "Honey's Natural Feeding Handbook for Dogs". Honeys will not pester you to purchase any of their products!
    You can also purchase this little book from Amazon from as little as 1p, plus a delivery charge of £2,80.
    This is a fantastic little book that is easy to read and understand, it will give you plenty of reassurance. :)
     
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  5. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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  6. kbb68

    kbb68 New Member Registered

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    Thank you, you replies have given me more peace of mind. Is it possible to feed a mixed diet? And if so should it be each meal that’s mixed or one dry one raw?
     
  7. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    It's usually recommended that you don't combine raw and kibble. The logic is that kibble interferes with the digestion of raw food - more details here: https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/can-you-mix-raw-dog-food-with-kibble/ Note that they say that you can combine them if you add a probiotic or apple cider vinegar.

    Having said that, plenty of people do combine them, either in separate meals or in the same meal, without any problems at all. Remember that even human dietary advice seems to change year to year and even month to month, so raw feeding isn't yet anywhere near being an exact diet.

    Why would you want to combine them? I think it's unlikely that combining them would be more balanced overall than a good varied raw diet.

    I do use kibble as rewards - along with all sorts of odds and ends like pizza crusts and Stilton rind. Though the latter are best avoided for a young pup!
     
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  8. kbb68

    kbb68 New Member Registered

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    I don’t really know Judy, this is all new to me! I was thinking a mix might be the best of both worlds, I think the vet has spooked me into thinking he may not be getting a balanced diet.
     
    Violet Turner likes this.
  9. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    We travel a lot so, much as I would like to feed it, raw is not a very convenient food for us. I sometimes feed raw but also use a dog food called Gentle which can be fed alongside raw. Gentle Dog Food, Natural Dog Food
     
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  10. Josie

    Josie Administrator Administrator Registered

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    Hello @kbb68 I have just done a review on @Pure Pet Food who freeze dry their food and then you rehydrate with water when you want to use it. It does mention that it's suitable for raw feeders when you are away and unable to continue with normal raw feeding. It may be of interest: pure-pet-food-review.
     
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