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The Raw Diet Tips and Recipes

Discussion in 'Dog Food and Diet' started by Violet Turner, Feb 16, 2018.

  1. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    What is a Raw Diet? A raw diet is a diet designed for dogs and humans to emphasis ‘Healthier Foods’ made at home. This originates from wolves and being in the wild, catching prey. This consists of bone, flesh, organs, and raw fruit and veg etc. When you feed raw it has lots of health benefits; Healthier gums, coat improvement, and improvement of digestion. BARF – Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (AKA) Bones And Raw Food. It consists of bone, raw meat, fruit and veg. For a balanced Raw Diet, you will need a ratio of = 80% raw meat 10% bone and 10% organs (offal), this doesn’t have to be daily this could be weekly instead. Don’t mix kibble with raw food – Kibble and raw is digested in different ways so you’re best off sticking with all raw or all kibble. If you have a puppy the process is much easier. Puppies prefer raw food to kibble most of the time. Once your dog enjoys raw food, you can look at treats that are raw too like; natures menu and I also believe Lily’s Kitchen also do raw dog treats. If you have decided raw food for your puppy, this is so health beneficial and can be more enjoyable. Well if you don’t know how much to feed your dog each day refer to this quote > ‘A lot of guides will recommend feeding 2.5% of the dogs ideal adult weight, this may be great in theory however every dog is different so it may be difficult to guess this weight.’ I was reading the Dog Magazine March Edition and it had an article on raw feeding and it scientists saying raw feeding being bad for dogs. As with anything, this is only to educate you this is not ‘rules’ to raw feeding.

    • If you would rather add your own fruit, veg and/ or grain to the just meat ranges we recommend that a meal should be made up of 60% meat, 20% blended vegetables and 20% non-starchy grain such as brown rice or oats and if you wish to go grain free you can give 80% meat and 20% blended fruit and vegetables.> Nature Diet



      ~ At the minute I feed olive home cooked, this looks a little like this: Some brown rice (half a cup), any vegies (excluding onion and garlic etc.), meat/fish that I have in most of the time it chicken or cod, and sometimes pasta. All put in the slow cooker for the day (Sunday) and pop it in the freezer. At the moment I’ve limited her diet down to half the week home cooked and the other kibble and wet food (Encore Beef + Applaws dry) ~
    In the future I will be posting raw food recipes on this thread, so do add to it with your own diets for your dog.



    **I have written the above in my own words and the italic text is quotes and captions from websites**

    @Josie move the thread if its in the wrong place!
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Can you explain why that is a problem? If I, for example, sit down to a meal tonight consisting of fish or meat, potatoes and vegetables these would be digested at different rates yet it is something we don't even think about in humans. It is a hypothesis I have heard so can you explain why is it considered a problem for a dog?
     
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  3. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    The theory - or maybe one theory - is that kibble is digested slower than raw, and as the raw meat can't 'overtake' it, the meat spends longer in the digestive tract and there's more chance of pathogens multiplying to dangerous levels. (A dog's short digestive tract means meat usually passes through more rapidly than in humans, which is why they can safely eat the odd dead bunny they find lying around on a beach of all places with no ill effects, mentioning no names Jasper.)

    However, I've seen an experiment in which a dog digested kibble faster than raw, I've come across plenty of people who mix them, even in the same meal, and no one who has encountered a problem through doing this.
     
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  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    That is the argument I have heard and I think I would understand it if a dog was fed half a meal of kibble then half a meal of raw a little later. But if it is mixed and all hits the stomach at the same time I don't really get the 'unable to overtake' thing. I could understand if it all slowed everything down to a longer digestion period but that doesnt seem to be the argument against it.
     
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  5. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    In kibble the starch changes the digestion of a dog, its slower to digest. Most raw food/Home cooked contains about15 percent of carbs. (None of which starch material). But for kibble there has to be approximately 50 percent starch for it to hold its shape, which on a high level like 50 percent is quite a bit bigger than raw food. Starch massively rises the pH of a dog’s stomach. Use humans have stronger digestive systems than dogs. That’s why we can eat whatever we want well not really ;)
    @JoanneF @JudyN
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
  6. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Sorry I just don't understand this. I am fairly confident the kibble I use doesn't contain 50% starch. Humans don't, in my opinion, have a stronger digestive system than a dog - we couldn't eat a rotting rabbit to stick with Judy's example - and what does "we can eat what we want well not really" mean?
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
  7. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    What i mean is we can eat a healthy diet, and i meant like chocolate for breakfast and pizza every day... yeah i know that because a mouldy food changes the enzymes in out stomachs. @JoanneF what brand of kibble do you use?
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
  8. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    Raw Food Diet 1 Weeks Worth Of Food

    Recipe #1

    What you will need:

    1 large bag of stewing beef

    Beef knuckle bone

    Chopped up organic kale, parsley, cabbage and a little bit of apple.



    Recipe #2

    What you will need:

    2 large chicken breast (organic) that include small bones

    Half a butternut sqwash

    Cabbage

    Some chopped up organic Weatgrass

    *Big meal*



    Recipe #3

    What you need:

    Blended Pumpkin

    1 Chicken Leg (organic with bone)



    Recipe #4

    What you will need:

    (Medium Pack) Lamb Stewing Meat

    Lamb Necks (bone)

    Organic Brocilli Stems (cooked for a small amount of time)



    Recipe #5

    What you will need:

    Beef stewing meat (Organic)

    Beef Rib bone

    Egg

    Cucumber Peeling

    Parsley

    Brocilli (cooked for a small amount of time)

    Cabbage (cooked for a small amount of time)



    Recipe #6

    What you will need:

    Goats Meat (Organic)

    Quinoa (cooked/uncooked)

    Pea Shoots (cooked for a small amount of time)

    Natural Yoghurt (Tablespoon)



    Recipe #7

    What you will need:

    Chicken Breast

    Chicken Wing Bone

    Egg

    Stewing Beef (A Small Chunk)

    Watermellon



    **Just a weeks worth of recipes off friends that raw feed there dogs**
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    That's a long way from the usual recommendations for a raw diet, Violet. For a start, there's no offal at all and hardly any bone, but each of these should account for 10% of the diet (excluding veg).

    Also, the general recommendation is that if veg is fed, it needs to be either throughly blended or lightly cooked for the dog to benefit from it.

    Portion size may be correct for your friend's dog but anyone else will have to calculate it according to the usual 2-3% of body weight per day.
     
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  10. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    I haven't put the bones on I'm stupid :( there dogs are medium/large dogs for small dogs just half the amount... @JudyN
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
  11. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    So is it a yes or a no for broccoli?

     
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  12. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
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  13. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    I never knew that about broccoli - we feed the odd floret know and again, perhaps we shouldn't be.
     
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  14. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    It's fine in small quantities, @arealhuman - like many foods it contains substances that would be toxic to us in large quantities but it's still a very healthy food.
     
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  15. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    Thanks for that @JudyN - he tends to have a floret or two when we have a meal with it, such as Sunday lunch. i'll continue to let him have some ;)
     
  16. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think as long as his entire diet isn't made up of 25% broccoli he will be fine!
     
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  17. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes that's what I mean.
     
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  18. Mrs S

    Mrs S Member Registered

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    We used to feed our old greyhound raw, she would have a bowl of tripe every morning (absolutely stinks... DO NOT feed it indoors lol) and evening I'd give her either chicken legs or a whole fish. She loved it and was in fantastic condition. I'd need to figure out quantities with the pup as he's alot smaller then she was. Also is it safe for puppies to have chicken bones? Worried about him choking?
     
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  19. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes a puppy have chicken bones, but i would have a consultation with your vet to see witch ones your breed of dog can have.
     
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  20. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    The amount to feed is 2-3% of bodyweight per day - you could start at 2.5% and see how he does.

    Yes, he can eat any chicken bones as long as they're raw. The only limitation is that large dogs shouldn't have small bits they might try to swallow whole, like chicken wings. You could even give your dog a whole chicken, wait till he's had his fill, pick it up, rinse it and put it in the fridge, then get it out at the next meal! (Assuming he's not a guarder or won't eat till his sick.)

    Of course, ask your vet if in doubt, but they're likely to know very little about raw feeding and may try to persuade you not to do it.
     
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