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Please someone give me advice!

Discussion in 'Puppy Forum' started by Stephhoney, Sep 17, 2020.

  1. Jan Woodhall

    Jan Woodhall Active Member Registered

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    Are you afraid the dog will lick the kids after eating or something? Do you not buy raw meats at all? bacon, sausages, turkey at christmas perhaps? Life is a balance, nothing is perfect, the risks of Salmonella are low these days. :)
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Prokolin is more expensive than yoghurt regardless of where you buy it. I use it for a quick fix for a runny bottom, with yoghurt more as a maintenance dose or to firm slightly loose poo rather than full blown diarrhoea.
     
  3. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    As I said, I don't know what the risks are, so I wouldn't tell everyone the risk isn't worth worrying about. If I've handled raw meat, I'll wash my hands and clean surfaces after. But if a dog eats raw meat, he doesn't wash his mouth thoroughly after, and then he may lick a child on the face, or the child may play fetch with the dog and then touch their mouth, so there's a clear transmission route of raw meat from the dog's mouth to the child's. As for the level of risk - my point is that decent scientific research to quantify this is unlikely to be easy to find, even if it exists.
     
  4. Tinytom

    Tinytom Active Member Registered

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    This problem has been sorted ..
     
  5. Jan Woodhall

    Jan Woodhall Active Member Registered

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    I am not sure about this of course, but I believe it is transmitted from faeces to mouth and not mouth to mouth? IF that is the case, then clearing up well after droppings of faeces would surely be the answer?
     
  6. excuseme

    excuseme Well-Known Member Registered

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  7. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    I'm not specifically thinking of salmonella. Put it this way - if you'd chopped up raw meat on a chopping board, would you lick the chopping board without washing it? No - so getting a Frenchie from a dog who has just eaten raw isn't the most pleasant thing.

    It's true, though, that dogs also lick their bums and then lick humans, so there's a degree of risk there regardless of whether they're raw fed. And dogs and children have coexisted for millennia with, I imagine, very few recorded cases of the children falling ill because of transmission of germs from the dog.
     
    Jan Woodhall likes this.
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    My concern about that article (and at this stage, I haven't read it all) is that the opening statement is ”Salmonella, along with rabies is a very unique disease: it can affect both humans and dogs. No other known diseases can do that.”

    That isn't right, I can think of several off the top of my head (campylobacter, leptospirosis, ringworm, parvo) and these are just ones that can spread between dogs and humans. If you wanted to be pedantic about the language used which just says diseases that affect both, you could also list cancer, Cushing's, diabetes, Addison's, dementia - and goodness knows how many more.
     
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  9. Monty's-Dog-Store

    Monty's-Dog-Store New Member Registered

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    Changing food can quickly upset a dog's stomach. This always happens with our bulldog (Monty). Dogs can also become allergic to certain foods as they get older. Monty used to be fine with chicken and beef, but now at the age of 2 he can't eat them. We found this out from him having an upset tummy and the inside of his paws and ears being red. He would also chew his paws due to them itching. Even the best foods can contain fish and chicken stock. Even the best dog foods can contain colours, additives and ingredients that can irritate your dog's tummy. Has a vet tested your dog to see if she has any food allergies?
     
  10. Hemlock

    Hemlock Well-Known Member Registered

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    ”Salmonella, along with rabies is a very unique disease: it can affect both humans and dogs. No other known diseases can do that.”

    Apart from the execrable grammar (how can anything be "very unique"?) this shows you the level of knowledge. Therefore read it for entertainment but be sure it isn't truth.
     
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  11. Jan Woodhall

    Jan Woodhall Active Member Registered

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    Yes JudyN, you are correct various transmissible and very dangerous stuff is transferred from dogs, clostridium, Leptospirosis for example and not contracted from raw meat. Good hygiene is imperative - kids are the worst offenders! LOL Bless them!
     
  12. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    Along with rabies!
     
  13. RGC

    RGC Member Registered

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    Good grief, there’s a first - “execrable grammar”. Never expected to see that on Dog Forum. Respect to you, Hemlock. However I’m mindful of alienating certain individuals on the site. Power to your pen.
     

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