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Discussion in 'General Discussions and Lounge' started by Josie, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. Finsky

    Finsky Active Member Registered

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    And now all this 'talk' about creepy things is making me feel so itchy. On eye lids...and 'there'...EEEEW indeed!
     
  2. Finsky

    Finsky Active Member Registered

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    Hmm...I wonder..when ticks meet each other if they have a conversations..'where did you go for your lunch?' ….'Oh I just did hang out on dog's bits' .. 'eww..why did you go there, couldn't find a better place!?' :rolleyes::D
    I'll put me coat on...I think I've passed my bed time... ;):D
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I have read somewhere that alcohol, or vaseline, or similar things cause a response that in turn causes the tick to regurgitate the blood it has sucked back into the host's bloodstream, and that vastly increases the risk of Lyme disease. I'll see if I can find it.

    Edit - I think I read it on an independent page but this confirms it Is this a tick
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  4. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    This isn't dog related, but I'm feeling a little down today. My grandparents' farm, where I spent all my childhood holidays collecting eggs, wandering round barns filled with farm equipment, playing 20' up in the haybales, and fishing for sticklebacks with nets made out of bamboo, wire, and Grandma's old stockings, has come on the market again: Check out this property for sale on Rightmove!

    It's changed hands a few times since my gran died in around 1992 and it was hard seeing the changes to the interior - but understandable that no one else would particularly want to live with rising damp, falling damp, gurgly cisterns, no central heating, wonky floors and death watch beetles - but the last lot have ripped the heart and soul from it :( It always felt like my spiritual home, but that spirit has been lost. My aunt and uncle life just over the driveway in the converted barns that they bought off my gran - I dread to think how they feel about it.
     
  5. Finsky

    Finsky Active Member Registered

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    Yes, different 'visions' how things should be can be bitter pill to swallow, particularly when there is such a warm memories attached for the place.
    But what a place you've had to play...oooooh...all those fields. I'm not quite sure why would one want really low corner settee right next to the dining table though...unless those who use the settee have really tall backs to reach on the table!? Bit odd one for my liking o_O
    Were you a bit of a 'tom boy' in your younger years then? I too spent my hols in my gran's place at the country..small small holding surroundings surrounded by dense woodland. We were always out and about and only seen when there was call for the food :D Oh the memories.
    To avoid such a heart break that you are experiencing, now that the old place do not have any soul anymore without granparents, I don't go there anymore at all. I rather cling on the pictures that I have in my mind of how things were.
     
  6. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    It is sad when that happens. It's a beautiful building and surroundings.
     
  7. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    The dining room used to be the dairy - dark, cool, and full of strange concoctions in jars like pickled walnuts which could possibly be classified as antique. My gran used to shoo my mum out of the dairy door on Sundays when she went cycling because my grandad didn't like her wearing shorts on the Sabbath! I'm not sure I was a tomboy as such, more a longer - I liked to just wander off and be alone in a barn with the smell of chicken feed... or manure :D... or befriending cattle. I spent a lot of time in the cupboard under the stairs too, rummaging through all sorts of 'stuff'.

    I will be visiting the outside again from time to time as my aunt & uncle are next door, living in the cowshed, milking parlour, granary & barn as we often comment. The 'grounds' have obviously changed a lot, with flower beds & veg plots gone from the front, and 'lawn' instead of cow pats, chickens and thistles, but being Grade II listed, at least the exterior of the house is mostly the same (though the wall separating the orchard from the path to the outside loo has gone).

    Like you say, I can still visit the interior any time I want in my mind :)
     
  8. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Active Member Registered

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    What a beautiful place. I imagine you must have had a wonderful time there as a child – it sounds idyllic.
     
  9. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    Yes it really was, Buddy1. I would collect the eggs every day in a wicker basket lined with straw - not just from the hen houses, but from all the little nooks & crannies in the barns where I'd learnt they lay. And I'd get up early every morning to watch my grandad milk his three Guernsey cows by hand (he'd pretty much retired by then and they were his pets, really). I used to feel sorry for anyone whose grandparents weren't farmers!
     
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  10. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    @JudyN - very nice. Miles would love the lawns... and the chickens :) What does "Grade II" mean?
     
  11. JudyN

    JudyN Well-Known Member Registered

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    It's an indication of the historical/architectural importance of the building (Grade I being the highest). I had a feeling that being Grade II meant that you had to keep the outward appearance but change what you want in the interior, but a read round the internet doesn't seem to back that up - you would, though, have to seek permission for changes that alter the appearance & structure.
     
  12. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think, at least in Scotland, that some outside features are protected too - so you couldn't put in PVC window frames for example, and exterior paint colour may also have to conform to certain standards.
     
  13. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Active Member Registered

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    What a wonderful description @JudyN, I'm feeling nostalgic and it isn't even my childhood:)
     
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  14. Ari_RR

    Ari_RR Well-Known Member Registered

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    Things never really returned to the "old ways" after 9/11 in New York, especially in Financial District of Manhattan, where my office is. For example, security with dogs in all big buildings, including ours. Not scary guard dogs, but sniffing dogs, Labradors, their primary job is to inspect cars entering the underground garage. But when not working the garage - they patrol the perimeter checking cars parked on the street, and on cold days just hang out in the lobby with the officers, getting LOTS of love from people who works there. Great for dogs.. great for people - free therapy. Nothing helps better than hugging a big soft lab on a stressful day. Often there is literally a line of dog huggers :)

    In other news - check out the new collar. Matches the harness, high visibility, reflective in the dark, and clearly identifies the owner :)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Buddy1

    Buddy1 Active Member Registered

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    Just been watching the news reports on the flooding. I know there are a few members who live in / near Wales. I hope you haven’t been too badly affected by the weather (or anyone else for that matter).
     
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  16. Finsky

    Finsky Active Member Registered

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    Happened this morning....

    We had typical 'terrier' night...both dogs were keeping their tabs 'on the job' for any unwelcome noises and couple of times they did want to go out to check everything was in order..nothing unusual there.
    So I wasn't really expecting having two lazy dogs this morning, in no hurry to go to their morning round or have their breakkies...oh no...not a twitch of a nose nor did I spot their beady eyes checking me out when I sat down front of computer to read morning news with BIG mug of tea on front of me...''ah..ok..they are having lie in''..

    But when it came to 10 am and I've been already been up for few hours..no movement from neither one, I started to get conserned..''are they ill...coming down with something!?''
    So I went to give them kisses and cuddle and then VERY lazily the sods got up and stretched themselves..tails were up and they seemed to be happy...but what has happened my usually hyper active and lively girls that I see first thing in the morning..they usually wake me up with toys in their mouths!? Most baffling...??

    Now little while ago I made myself a cup of coffee...my usual hot drink at the first thing in the morning and enjoy it with girls with couple of rich tea bickies...they get to share the little undipped edge between themselves..that is our daily thing. But now it seems that my change for a tea (without a accompany of bickies), it is not worth of getting up!! :D:D They obviously can tell the difference and when ever I have tried to walk by them without any hint of showing what I'm about to eat, to get it all for myself..it ain't possible, they just know :rolleyes: It must be the smell of coffee..
    So now I have had coffee in my tummy..dogs have had their small pieces of RT bickies..and they are having a full blown play..the day has finally started! :rolleyes::D Funny things they are...
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020 at 11:23 AM
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  17. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I'm puppy sitting for a 6 month old schnauzer. I'm his fairy godmother. OMG what a culture shock - I'd forgotten how everything to a 6 m.o. is so EXCITING!
     
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  18. Finsky

    Finsky Active Member Registered

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    :D:D Do you still fancy having a youngster? Yes, it is a shock for the system, but eventually one gets used to it..trust me! ;)
     
  19. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I think Timber would object. I'm staying at my friend's house with her pup today.
     
  20. Josie

    Josie Administrator Administrator Registered

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    Just had a company try and sign up to the directory...

    offering suicide pills no less.

    craziness
     

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