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Bossy puppy with 4 previous homes

Discussion in 'Dog Behaviour and Training' started by Ava, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. JoanneF

    JoanneF Well-Known Member Registered

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    I would say don't fret over that, dogs don't really bear grudges in that way.

    It's more likely he wasn't taught bite inhibition. Puppies use their mouths in play with their siblings so when they come to live with their humans they normally are taught that this is no longer ok. Try keeping a toy handy to put in his mouth so he can't mouth the hand, or as soon as teeth get skin ask the person to firmly turn and walk out of the room. If you are out with him, immediately walk him away. The objective is for him to learn that teeth on skin = end of play.
     
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  2. Violet Turner

    Violet Turner Well-Known Member Registered

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    When he bites you say ‘Ouch’ in a calm voice, gently remove your arm/hand/foot/leg etc. from his mouth and take your attention off him for two to five seconds. If he continues to grab you when you take your attention away put yourself on the other side of the pen/gate, when he is calm again you can re-engage. Puppies and adult dogs have to learn through repetition, this will a lot of time take your time with this process time. Your pup wants good stuff to stick around. When he discovers that biting hard makes you (good stuff) go away, he’ll decrease the pressure of his bite and eventually stop biting hard (Hopefully) it’s always a good idea to have toys handy to occupy your dog’s teeth when he’s in a persistent biting mood.

    What not to do when he bites:

    1. High pitched yelp/squeal (This can make the dog more excited and play bighting can take place.)

    2. Hold the dog’s mouth closed (This will only make the dog get frustrated.)

    3. Put your fist down his throat (This could actually injure the dogs mouth and will not be pleasant to the dog in the situation, it won’t help in any way.)

    4. Bite your dog back. (I have seen this on a few occasions, believe me and I really have seen dogs that have been bitten by their owners to stop biting.)
     
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  3. JudyN

    JudyN Moderator Moderator Registered

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    The high-pitched yelp teamed with walking away can work for some dogs, though as Violet says, it can overexcite others, so you may need to work out what works best for your dog.
     
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  4. arealhuman

    arealhuman Well-Known Member Registered

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    If it helps, ours has no interest with toys when out and about, not that we'd let him of the lead in an open field anyway (no recall at all). Good luck with it all, and keep us all updated! :)
     
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  5. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife Well-Known Member Registered

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    .

    I believe U're overthinking this - yes, bad experiences at the vet's can make a dog anxious or fearful IN THAT SETTING, but it doesn't generalize to "every human being" outside that context. Dogs luckily do not generalize well or quickly; humans do, often to our detriment.

    Besides which, his actual neuter was under GA - he felt no pain 'til he woke up, & most vets do give pain-meds, these days; the hurt should have been minimal. // Anything scary would be prior to the surgery, or post-surgery, not the RESULT of the surgery.
    And if he had a fright, then it would be specific to the setting of the vet's office - or somewhere similar - that he'd feel anxious or defensive, if some event B4 or after his desex was so awful.

    Stop beating Urself up - dogs become less-accepting of strangers as they get older; most young puppies, esp'ly under 8-WO, are universally open to new friends, of any species. [That's why LGDs are introduced to the breed they will protect shortly after they leave the nest - so they bond to them "like family".]
    Pre-pubertal pups are more suspicious of strangers, a bit cautious or even timid; pubertal pups have their territorial instinct kick in, & will bark at strangers who come to the door, or who approach when U've been sitting on a park-bench or a blanket on the beach for awhile. It doesn't mean they can't make friends at any age; they're just not universally open anymore, & the older pups get, their personal space expands - till they reach adulthood.
    It's a normal process, just like human infants transitioning to toddler, then pre-school, school-age, pre-puberty, puberty, adulthood.

    - terry

    .
     
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  6. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    He bites my husbands hand harder than he bites mine! :D It's mainly when one of us has been out & he's excited to see we have returned home safely! He repeatedly jumps and bites. It's not that hard, but I keep my hands out of the way.
    My husband says "ouch" but because he doesn't move his hand from his mouth, our doggy probably thinks it's a game. I usually say "gentle" & he understands that & doesn't really bite my hands at all now.....but I'm the boss! :p
     
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  7. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    Yep, I think our doggie thinks he must be big and strong if he can my husband yelp! ;) Like I said above, the hand biting is more when he's excited to see us, but in general he bites a bit to hard on my husbands hands. He makes slight teeth marks, but doesn't break the skin.
    :oops: I've told my husband to say "gentle" because it works for me, but
    our doggie is more rough with him. o_O
     
  8. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    This is really good to know. Worrying is something I'm highly skilled in!
    Something I wanted to add...
    When our doggie wants to lick our face, his tongue makes a licking sound as he approaches. I know that sounds silly, but I mean louder than normal. It's as if he's asking if he can lick.
    When he's approaching (or being pushed gently away) he shows his teeth quickly, then sticks his tongue out and makes a loud licking sound, then flashes his teeth again and so on. He doesn't lick his lips, he flicks his tongue out in the direction of our faces. (well, mainly my husband's face as he's obsessed with licking him! ) When he's actually licking, you don't see his teeth at all. We don't know what to think
     
  9. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    Awe, it does make me feel better, actually. In the nicest possible way! ;):D I feel ur pain!
     
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  10. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    IMG_20171028_094708.jpg
     
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  11. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    That pic of him was taken a few days after we had him. They previous owners had shaved his fur off.... It's all grown back now. His tail is Fluffy again. :)
     
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  12. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    Attached Files:

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  13. Ava

    Ava Member Registered

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    I've only just watched these videos.
    The dogs are so patient. The kibble on their paws was precious.
    My dog will always wait for me to give the go ahead before taking food or toys, but I need to extend that self control to outside the house, where he thinks that doesn't apply! :/
     

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